Friday, November 18, 2011

Rock Beauty! Fridays Fences!

He builded better than he knew;-

The conscious stone to beauty grew.

                   Ralph Waldo Emmerson

 As soon as I drove down this country road surrounded by the empty trees of Fall I knew I had found a great piece of history. I was lucky enough to find the most beautiful display of stone fence building I had ever seen. The whole farm was surrounded by these massive walls of rock, dividing each field. There were boulders so huge; I have no idea how they had been moved. I can only imagine the work that went into these fences, backbreaking work to say the least.    

The area where I discovered this beauty is up North, on very rocky ground. It was not a farm you would have wanted to own to grow crops. It must have taken years to turn this ground of bush and rocks into a self-sufficient farm. I admire our ancestors for there work. I am sure many a man, or women had died trying to make this place a farm. It would have been a very difficult existence.



 There was a beautiful old plank barn here, and an old deserted house. My heart aches thinking of the pain

this family would have endured when they first settled this land.

Their legacy will live on, I am so happy the person that owns it now just put rails on top of the stone

fence, preserving the history. It is truly a beautiful site to see.

 This is why I could not pick only one photo.



 Many more beautiful fences to see just visit  http://lifeaccordingtojanandjer.blogspot.com/2011/11/fridays-fences-8.html

Later.

26 comments:

  1. I can't imagine how long it took to build that! It's beautiful!

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  2. Wow...I can just imagine the hard work invovled with this stone structure! Great find and piece of the past! Thanks for playing FF

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  3. Love love love this fence-oh the stories it has seen and quietly listens to the world!

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  4. Have you ever visited Yorkshire. You would be absolutely beside yourself with joy. :-)

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  5. when you showed us a peek of this the other day, i SO hoped you'd show more for friday's fences. yay!!! LOVE stone fences! i wish we could have them here! just not enough material to work with...

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  6. Lots of work for sure and artistry as well!
    I remember seeing some of these many years ago on a trip to Maine.

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  7. These shots remind me of a couple places near my parent's farm that have rock walls like that... I'll have to take a drive out there this weekend. I always think about the hard, backbreaking work that went into them... God bless them!

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  8. ooooohhhhh this is perfect, with a big splash of history!!

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  9. I agree Buttons--these stone fences are true testiment to the determination of farmers who settled these hard places. In Kentucky we have many dry stone fences that are over a hundred years old-built by Scots-Irish settlers and slaves (KY was a border state in the Civil War). The fences are wonderful subject for the photographer--interesting from every perspective. As you've proved in these photos!

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  10. I'm always impressed by the heritage left by people who took a place and put their life into it, handed it down for generations and stayed with it through all kinds of adversity. Family farms, terraces in China, ancient cities in South America-- civilizations that didn't quit when things got tough.

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  11. This reminds me of rambling around Gettysburg, Pa. I love old stone fences, so sturdy and strong they can withstand the test of time.
    Nice shots, B.
    Have a wonderful weekend.

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  12. So many rocks and so shallow the soil on the Precambrian Shield. I too have often wondered how the first farmers survived there!

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  13. That's a great stone fence. I love the trees either side of it as well. Just adds something to it!

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  14. My old farm in the Ottawa Valley has miles of these old fences running hither and yon. I can't imagine how long it took them to finish this. We've let the old pastures grow up again. Someday perhaps someone else will feel the need to clean the place out again.

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  15. This is a beautiful fence, built to last. I love the trees on either side in the last shot. I imagine they grew up there after the fence was built, and now they mark its path. It's almost as if the fence was laid out between them...

    Thanks for your comment. I will remember her for a long time.

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  16. No way to do one photo on something this timeless. Good find!

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  17. These are incredible pictures! What an amazing fence. Thanks for sharing.

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  18. that is magnificent! nothing could've stopped me from walking it. ;o)

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  19. The farm I grew up on in Ney York used to have the most amazing and beautiful stone walls all over it but not anymore. In the 90's the "family" - Uncle and cousins decided that they needed the money the stone would provide for them so they've stripped the land of the old stone walls, loaded them on pallets and sent them South or into the cities so the rich folk can have stone walls built. It makes trips back home to the farm place depressing - I only go back for my reunions - once every 5 years. I loved seeing your photos - definitely reminded me of my memories of what once was.

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  20. Buttons Thoughts...such an appropriate name for your Blog. I always enjoy the thoughts you share. You have a very caring, compassionate heart and I admire the way you always look beneath the surface trying to discover the soul of each of your subjects. I am so obsessed with stonewalls and rocks and at every opportunity I get, I lug a rock home to be lovingly placed in my garden. I cannot tell you how much I have spent on buying bags of river stone from our local nursery over the years. This is one area where I don't agree at all with less is more. I, too, would have been so drawn to the beauty of these aged walls. Lovely photographs and I could still have enjoyed seeing any more :)

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  21. I am so amazed at how many of these fences you find. How fun to explore and find such historical treasures. I really love the one with the rail fence on top. Since I despise digging post holes I'm all for that one. I'd haul a rock 100 yards, before I could dig 2 inches. My kind of people. Ha.

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  22. That is the most beautiful fence I have seen so far, it says a lot, imagine carrying all that stone, someone had to lift it some time to get it there or in the ute, what a great find
    Bridget#2

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  23. oh that fence is one of the best memories ever for that place - rock by rock it was built...

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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