Friday, March 16, 2012

Nature's Sweetness!

“A wilderness of sweets.”   John Milton


On my way to my Mother’s, I pull off to the side of the road to admire a line of Maple trees with the aluminum buckets hung from taps with hooks, surrounding each one of the trees. I get out and walk over to take a closer look. I hear a droplet of the sap hitting the bottom of the bucket and the ping echoes through the pail, another drop follows close behind.

I was wondering if our unusually warm winter, or should I say non-existent winter, would affect the running of the sap. I am now sure it still has found its place in the season. I jump back into the Jeep and take a detour to check out a little place I know.


 I was excited as I pull up to DH’s little Sugar Shack and see the steam billowing out through the opening in the roof; this tells me he is boiling sap to make Maple Syrup. I roll down the window and smell the air. This sweet, sweet smell floats into the air on the droplets of steam, lingering, to the pleasure of all who are lucky enough to live, or just happen to be driving by, to enjoy.
I make my way to the back door of the Sugar Shack, I pass the sign that reminds passer-by’s to come to the Annual Pancake breakfast to enjoy this delicious Ontario Maple Syrup with friends, and neighbours.

DH has quite the operation running here; it is a far cry from Homesteaders I have had the pleasure of watching boil the sap, by burning wood or gas under an evaporator pan out in the open, near the Maple bush. There is no need to worry about the rainy weather stopping production in this Shack.


Inside this well organized little Sugar Shack (not really a shack), I explain to DH what I was doing, and I ask if I could take some photos to share on my blog. He graciously said yes and showed me around. I was amazed at the size of the evaporator pan and all the shiny equipment and pipes running everywhere. DH showed me the brains of the operation in a little room just to the left of the very steamy evaporator. I had never seen anything like it.  I could tell DH was as happy to share his knowledge of his operation with me, as I was to see it. This was not your ordinary Sugar Shack this technological operation had me in awe.


I want to thank DH for sharing his sweetness factory with me and I look forward to the Annual Pancake breakfast to try some of this sweet Maple Syrup. On second thought, since I bought a liter “What am I waiting for?”


Oh yes; this sweet nectar of Nature was so worth the drive. I jump back into the Jeep with the window down and slowly drive away while taking in every last drop of that lingering sweet smell.

Later

17 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing this behind the scenes view of the Sugar Shack. It was great fun!

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  2. Well that sure is a LOT different than watching my Great-Aunt Nellie standing over the cooking sap monitoring the sap in the pans with an ancient thermometer and dumping chunks of butter in it as it cooked. This was followed by another cooking by my Grandmother in the farm house entry where she skimmed the sap and turned those skimmings into maple sugar.

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  3. I wonder if they are the same maples I have growing here. I'm off to find out.
    I have never really given any thought as to where maple syrup comes from. Now I know. Fascinating. Thanks.

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  4. I just might have to make some pancakes for breakfast...I have some Maple Syrup (yummmmmm) on hand!
    This really does look like quite the operation...the only time I saw maple sugaring was in upstate New York when I was a senior in high school. That was a shack...nice, but a shack none-the-less.

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  5. I too was wondering if this year there would be a maple syrup season with the winter we have had.......thanks for sharing,

    Gill

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  6. oh, Canadian Maple Syrup...... now I just have to make some maple syrup scones....

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  7. amazing operation! love all the shiny chrome! i hope he gets a wonderful harvest!

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  8. That was fascinating B - thank you! The gorgeous sweet smell has drifted all the way here :D)

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  9. oh, that is a much larger operation than my dads! ha! i do love that smell. as do the bears. ;o)

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  10. Sap is still running here, which I thought was questionable at the beginning of the season. Quota is down, but taste is excellent!

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  11. Wow - love the name and love the product. That first photo was just too cool. I would have had to stop too.

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  12. I am certainly going to have to buy some this year... Yum!!

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  13. How cool! I haven't been to an operation of this size, but would love to!

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  14. We noticed our maples are "sapping" (if that's the term?) here too. Not enough to make syrup though, rats!

    This is an awesome operation and I'm so glad you bought some. :)

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  15. Love that 'real' syrup.. love those shots!

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  16. Interesting. Has this year's harvest been a good one?

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  17. Coming from Wisconsin - we NEVER have flavored corn syrup on the table - has to be the real thing...Im glad you feel the same way!!

    that said, we heard you can tap box elder trees as they are from the same family -thats what we have around here...

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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