Thursday, August 23, 2012

Romantic Starry Nights on the Farm!

Not what we have, but what we use;
Not what we see, but what we choose—
These are the things that mar or bless
The sum of human happiness.
         Clarence Urmy


I can see the twinkling stars above my head when the wind blows the cedar branches. I stand very still trying to not trip over the tree roots I cannot see but feel underneath my feet. I can still feel the sting of the Prickly Ash bush across the top of my forehead. I cannot see My Hero but I know he is not too far away so I talk to keep myself calm or to scare off in my mind the creatures of the forest that may be lurking behind the thick bushes. It is pitch dark and I can only see shadows when those branches move. I stare back up at the trees waiting for the wind to blow so I will be able to see the stars. I keep talking even though I know he cannot hear.

This little adventure all started when My Hero jumped out of his chair and opened the front door to our house after hearing a sound. Two of our stocker cows (I will call them Mutt and Jeff) were staring back. Anyone who has ever had cattle or knows someone who does understands that sick feeling in the pit of my stomach. After all it is 8pm and semi dark out. After much running, directing, and gate opening we get the two (thank goodness) cows (escapees) back with the rest of the herd. They happily run back to their friends with a great story of escape and adventure of a day unrestricted by barriers and rules and fields of green exploring the neighbours.  After an hour of that I was tired and we came back into the house to sit and enjoy what was left of the evening.  I was actually seriously thinking of my nice soft bed and fluffy pillow.

We then started discussing how they had escaped and I imagined that they were telling their friends all about it; this would make for a world of trouble for me alone tomorrow if they returned to that spot. This is when we jumped in the truck and drove down the old boundary road in the dark scanning the fence row of bushes and trees. After a while we came across the spot My Hero thought would be the problem, he hiked into the bush and came back with a half-smile. We head to the house to get the tractor and supplies.

This is the part where I find myself standing in the darkness surrounded by Prickly Ash bushes, and Cedar trees. I was sweating under the long sleeves I had luckily pulled on, after dragging two rails down a cow path ducking under those annoying bushes and around those Cedars with My Hero close behind. I had been juggling the flashlight and when I came upon the hole in the fence I dropped the heavy rails. My Hero dropped his rails and told me to stay (he was worried about my inability to navigate in the dark, I guess, or maybe the commentary about darn Prickly Ash, darn cows), he took the flashlight and went back to the tractor, that we could not drive into this thick bush, to get more rails, the fence pliers and wire. I stand still talking and hoping nothing is standing right behind me in the dark, and wait for him to come back. I can hear the tractor running and once in a while when the wind blew I get a glimpse of the headlights so I know he is not too far away. Did something touch my leg? (shiver)

He returns and starts tearing the old fence down, I hold the flashlight, he then starts to build the new fence. This is flashlight fencing at its best. I hold the flashlight with one hand and juggle the other end of the rail while he wires it to the picket. Our flashlight is fading fast so we work quickly. Just as My Hero starts to twist the wire of the last rail our flashlight dies. I cannot see a thing. We gather the supplies (that would be him I am totally confused) and I shuffle behind My Hero back down the cow path, he hollers back to  me to be careful there is Prickly Ash on the right side I smile, it was too late it smacks me in the head. Finally the tractor lights come into view we hop back into the tractor and drive from the back of the farm to the house with my few cuts and bruises but a job well done and an interesting story to tell of my own. Goodnight it is 11pm.


I hike back at first light to make sure there are no other surprises back there and make sure the escapees cannot head out for another adventure and bring their friends. The fence looks great. My Hero is good at Flashlight Fencing. Now that is true romance, he has saved me from chasing escaping cattle; he will always be My Hero.

Later.

Rural Thursday Blog Hop

Thanks to our hosts Nancy and Lisa

32 comments:

  1. Having chased more than a few escaped cows in my day I agree; he is a hero! And you are a heroine, in many ways and in many stories. *hugs*

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  2. Sounds exhausting. We don't have cows, but they surround us, and we simply call our neighbors to say 'hey, you've got an escapee.' Now I know the rest of the story! Great work!

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  3. Fence repairs are endless, that's for certain. Thank goodness you won't have to chase cows for at least another day...we hope.

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  4. My first husband and I had two cows on two acres. We were NOT farmers. One day we saw one of those cows in the front yard! OMG! They took off into the farmers cornfield next door. I thought for sure we'd never get them back. And that was the first time I had ever been running through a cornfield. I came face to face with one of those cows, and I took off running in the other direction!!! SCARED ME TO DEATH!!!!! We finally got them back in the fence. I completely forgot about that until now.

    Cindy Bee

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  5. Very interesting your text, I loved the night life through your words, the photos are beautiful. Greetings.

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  6. Cows are sneaky! Hope they don't pull that one again!

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  7. No matter how familiar the territory, once darkness falls it's another world out there.

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  8. Excellent post ~ You definitely work hard for a living ~ though life is busy for you ~ you have love! ~ thanks for sharing your experience ~ (A Creative Harbor)

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  9. awesome story but the best part for me, is how you talk about your hero. good stuff!!

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  10. What a story! So much for a nice, peaceful evening.

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  11. A great story. You could have a children's book about a cow character(s) escaping and then later going to their friends telling each other about it.

    http://theapels.blogspot.com/2012/08/fun-and-games-outside.html

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  12. I just love the way you relate your life in writing. You had me pretty scared, right along with you.

    I'm so glad you have your Hero, B!

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  13. late night / date night farm style. :)

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  14. You have an excellent writing skill!
    I am glad all cows are accounted for and the fence is sturdy.

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  15. Not the best way to spend an evening even if you did get to go on an adventure with Your Hero. Cows may be considered not to smart but they can sure remember a hole in a fence. At least you discovered the escapees before they did damage and led the rest of the herd out for a party.

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  16. That is quiet the story...your a great story teller!
    Laurie @ Pride in Photos

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  17. Hey, whatever it takes to get a little quality time together under the romantic starry skies!! ;-)

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  18. A beautiful story and a beautiful photo. Thanks for coming by and for your comment.

    Yael from Home Garden Diggers

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  19. I do not do well in the dark. I imagine things staring at me, plus as I get older I just can't see anything in the dark anymore. Glad you two got the fence fixed up! Thanks for stopping by my blog. I just became a follower of yours.

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  20. I could nearly hear your mutters! I'm glad he was able to get it fixed last night.

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  21. There is a neighbor up the road from Farmer who, whenever I see his name on my phone *after hours* I just KNOW that it's not going to be good news.
    Once again, the prisoners have escaped the asylum! lol

    Next could you please write what the cows told their friends....? :D

    *huggies*

    Mimi
    The Goat Borrower

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  22. You won't soon forget your adventure and I'm pretty confident it won't be your last.

    The best part of your story is it ended well.

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  23. Hi Fellow Photo Meme participant, Just a quick note to let you know that starting tomorrow, I will begin hosting a new photo meme on my blog. Please come join me at "Orange You Glad It's Friday", and post a photo displaying a little or a lot of orange, my favorite color! Hope to see you there!

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  24. Interesting blog! I enjoyed your cow story - glad I decided to come visiting. :) I have never chased an escapee cow before, but I did help round up an escaped llama once. Her name was Heather, and she had really long eyelashes. I remember being afraid she would decide to trample me instead of go back. She didn't, but the experience is still vivid in my memory.

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  25. Wow, such an adventure - that darkness would certainly freak me out. Glad everything is OK!

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  26. My goodness, I can relate to your story :) love M xoxoxox

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  27. You faced your fears, your hero saved the day ( and the night), the cows are contained. Seemingly so simple, yet hard work, and your telling of it made me feel I was right there along with you in the dark.(shiver!)

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  28. Chasing escaped animals is always an adventure, especially at 0'dark thirty.
    It's so nice to read about your hero, keep up the good work.
    Visiting via Rural Thursday Blog Hop.

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  29. lovely country images, and quite the story!! ... thank you for visiting last week!

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

Please do not copy my work. If you like it let me know I am sure we can work something out. Copyright is in place.