Tuesday, September 4, 2012

A Tractor Graveyard!

The first and simplest emotion which we discover in the human mind,
is curiosity.
        Edmund Burke


 Labour Day weekend started very early Saturday morning with plans of going to an auction with just a quick stop at a farm machinery dealer first. My Hero has been working on a project and needed some spare parts. I was willing to go anywhere because honestly a day away from the farm and no Labour on Labour Day Weekend is just what I had wished for. Brother D had decided to go too so I sat in the back and listened to them chat about the sale and all the tools that would be there. Oh boy, I must admit I should really learn to pay more attention to those sale ads in the paper, another big tool auction (surprise). Well with past experience I had learned that whenever I go to a sale with these two it always turns out to have photo and story-worthiness. We have always had a good time. I closed my eyes and drifted into a semi- sleep while driving to that machinery parts store.

We arrived at the farm machinery sale yard and the boys went to work taking parts off an old baler in the yard. They had brought their tools and yes since I had mine (my camera) I jumped out to see what photos awaited me. I must admit I never really paid much attention to a scrap and new farm machinery yard and was soon sucked into an incredible world of rusty metal and broken metal parts, a tractor graveyard of sorts. There was tall brown grass, yellow goldenrod, green leaves and dead thistles surrounding rust, and parts of machinery at every description and colour, oh this was going to be fun. The owner came out the back door to talk to the boys and I asked if I could wander around and take some photos. His answer was yes, I was happy about that since I had already snapped about twenty interesting shots just near the backdoor.

I meandered around with the short brown grass crunching under my feet; I tried to avoid the thistles and weeds, as not to get my feet tangled. I would stop periodically if something caught my eye, and something always did.  A lime green flipped over tractor hood, or the site of a rusty tractor almost devoured with weeds except that the old frame, the metal seat and the old steering wheel were peeking through trying hard not to disappear altogether.



 I tried to get as close as I could hoping not to feel any slithering, creepy things crawl across my feet or hopefully not see some scurrying thing like a rat. I took a bunch of shots of things I am guessing some people have never noticed. I crept deeper behind old buildings all the while peering into bushes. The bushes that had been long forgotten and neglected had now created a life of their own, ignoring anything that would be in the way, consuming many secret treasures as it grew. This is when I noticed a steering wheel; I pushed myself deeper into the gnarled bushes. I had to see what these bushes were trying so very hard to conceal. I pushed myself into the center and was completely surrounded by darkness and branches; I pressed on and discovered this scratchy, creepy path was so worth it. Sitting right beside what looked like an old wall of a building there sat a very old GM truck, it had an old wooden almost completely rotten box on the back and I am guessing it had been parked here and forgotten long ago. Someone may have had big plans for restoration but now since the bushes had hidden it away it appeared that those plans had been long abandoned. I took quite a few shots but was starting to get a little nervous about not knowing what was living in and near it so I pulled myself away and squeezed back out into the light.



Back in the light, I walked behind where the boys were working, I stopped as I discovered something new and shouted to Brother D, a mechanic and great admirer of old vehicles “Wow you have to come see this truck”. The boys were so busy fighting with that old baler that was not willing to give up its old original parts and obviously wanted to remain in this Tractor Graveyard that unwilling to leave My Hero alone to fight with those rusty bolts and with the wrenches, he hollers that he would come and look later. I hiked/slid down the embankment and started checking it out with my camera.

 I loved the way the paint had curled and the sunlight was casting shadows and the bright light bounced off the surviving back window. I loved the rusted holes in the fenders with the blue paint still trying to hold on. The shape of the fenders and the old headlight pots, the look of the old horsehair seat ripped apart and scattered inside exposing the old springs. There was nothing I did not like about this truck. I took many photos of the outside of it and then decided to take photos inside. Since the doors did not open I reached in, holding tight to my little Canon Power Shot; I reached as far in as I could to get a shot of the dash with all its very cool gauges, which seemed so intriguing to me at the time, I immediately felt a sting on my finger. I almost dropped my camera; thank goodness I always loop the strap around my wrist. I jerked my arm back quickly and noticed that it immediately started to swell and I must admit it really hurt. I decided even though this was the best thing I have found to photograph for a while I was to abandon the quest for more photos. It was so worth the pain. I think I have some great shots and as a bonus, I also found out I am not allergic to bees (thank goodness) even though my swollen hand had me frightened for a little bit.



The boys finally convinced the baler to give up those needed parts, Brother D hiked down the embankment to see the truck and heard buzzing in the back of the truck where the original old hood had been thrown, I guess the bees or hornets were guarding this little treasure. After close inspection by Brother D, and My Hero getting things settled with the baler we head to the all-important “tool auction”. I am a little more excited at the prospects of this auction now since this trip to the Tractor Graveyard turned out to be full of surprises, so you never know and I have never been to Madoc.



Brother D did a little research and said he is pretty sure it was a 1939 International D pickup truck, I thought that was a very interesting thing but honestly I had really fallen for the look of those rusty holes, the curling chipped blue and black coloured paint, the shape of the windows and the curves of the fenders, no matter what kind it was. I do wish I could have seen that dash a little clearer. Darn bees.

Later

24 comments:

  1. It takes someone filled with beauty herself to see the beauty in the old, forgotten things the rest of the world has passed by.

    Thanks so much for your kind words Buttons, it's good to be back. *hugs*

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  2. Solche Orte mit diesen alten Objekten gefallen mir gut, da ist so viel Geschichte drin, schön so etwas zu sehen...

    Lieben Gruß
    CL

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  3. Love that last shot!! You are a lot braver than I am!!! There are a couple of old trucks that I have seen, but not gotten near! And I am not likely to, this year. My adventure with the wild parsnip has made me very cautious now...

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  4. How neat! reminds me of an episode of American Pickers - have you ever watched that show?

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  5. What is it about rusty long-forgottens that make them so interesting? These shots are great, and I love that last close-up of the remaining paint hanging on for dear life. Thanks for sharing!

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  6. Wow, don't those bee stings hurt.
    Your tale and photos remind me of many towns I pass through on my travels, nearly every town has a place where they store old truck, tractors, cars and other machinery which always can be seen from the road. However a great find for you.....love M oxoxox

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  7. Wow! A photographer's mecca! That truck is so cool-love the headlight and peeling paint.

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  8. Such fantastic finds and beautiful photos! Sorry 'bout those darn bees!

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  9. love that last shot with all the colors and rust. you are an explorer. :)

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  10. Dilapidated and rusty. Love it. The last shot is my favorite.

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  11. You will do anything to find treasures and make an adventure out of an "ordinary" day! :) I'm glad you didn't come across anything creepy, crawly in there. The bees were bad enough!

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  12. It sounds like a fun filled interesting day! You got some great photos.

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  13. Old equipment like that makes for great subjects! That's a wonderful find!

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  14. I would have SO been right there with you exploring the beauty made by nature using rust and flowers. You were very conservative to only show us three of your photos. I want to see those old gauges and the horsehair seat, although your words painted a wonderful picture. Love the curled paint and the way the light and shadows play around the weathered edges.

    Sorry you got caught by the defenders of the old machinery, and you were probably lucky to get away with only one sting. But I'd have done the same thing.

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  15. Amazing pics and thought verse. Nice to be back.

    have a pleasant week, k?

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  16. Amazing photos buttons!! Quite the adventure-I however am allergic to bees-so would have had a different ending-with me running for my epi pen!!!

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  17. thank you..THANK YOU.. for sharing this post with photo's I LOVE old TRUCKS and my wish is to someday own one...
    ~~Blessings~~

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  18. There you go again - wandering off and taking us with you. It's my favorite part of your actions : )

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  19. she's a beauty! with age comes character. or so i keep telling myself that. ;)

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  20. How cool is that?! I love a rusty, old truck.

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  21. reminds me of the 'old girl' I took some shots of last year. Someone loved that truck a long time ago. Great shots, Buttons.
    Sue

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  22. Great pictures! I love seeing old rusty vehicles! :)

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  23. I love all the rusty treasures you photographed. You were smart to join the boys on their way to the auction!

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  24. How fun. I love the photos of that old truck.

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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