Thursday, November 8, 2012

A Sad Sign of the Times!

It is worthwhile for anyone to have behind him a few generations of honest,
            hard-working ancestry.
                                                John Phillips Marquand


Standing at an auction this week I realized just how many farm auctions we have been to this past year. It seems there is one every couple of weeks. We have not attended all of them but our local papers have pages full of those listings. When I read those listings I always think about the day we will have to face that inevitable day. I put that thought out of my mind for the moment and concentrate on this beautiful old farm.

I stare at the For Sale sign on the lawn stuck in the ground in front of the most beautiful painted white clapboard house that I have had the pleasure of seeing in quite a while. There is a Widow’s Walk door just above the old porch. The original tin roof is still intact be it a little rusty yet still strikingly beautiful. I think about the new tin roofs they put on houses today and wonder why they do not last as long.


I try to imagine the inside of this old house with all its original dark wood trim and a beautiful old dark wood banister surrounding an old staircase. I wonder how many generations of hard-working family members have climbed these stairs making their way to the comfort of their bed; aching and exhausted after the dawn till dusk physical labour of running this farm. They would have gotten up early, before the sun the next morning only to do it all over again every day for generations. Never thinking that there was any other way, they were working to feed themselves and other families and never thought of it as anything but their life, and a viable honest future for their family and their future generations.

I can see the old rundown barn with the rusty roof and faded red painted barn boards. It sits surrounded by overgrown fields and rail fences that took so much time and sweat to build and maintain. There is a herd of Hereford cows grazing in the field behind on the land that no longer belongs to this property. This farmland has been severed off and sold, the house being sold separately. I do hope the farmland was sold to a neighbouring farmer still optimistic about the future.  


This scene is being repeated over and over all across North America. Am I the only one who feels this overwhelming sense of loss and sadness?

Later.

Sharing with Rural Thursday Blog Hop with our hosts Nancy and Lisa.

Rural Thursday Blog Hop

45 comments:

  1. It happens here all the time. With the jump in land prices, not many old farmstead homes and barns are left. :(

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  2. How I would love to have a place like this and land with it too! I hope someone fixes up the house and keeps the character alive.

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  3. It's sad that farming has become a life that so few are able (or willing) to live!

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  4. I hope that someone buys it who will appreciate it.

    A lawyer bought up all the land around here, and I'm hoping he isn't planning to subdivide, build, and conquer.

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  5. No, you are not the only one, Buttons. It's very, very sad. I live in York Region just north of Toronto where farm land is nearly extinct. I live on the north end of the region but we can see subdivisions and malls galloping up our way. Makes me wonder where future generations will be growing their food.

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  6. I am one of those who bought one of those old farmsteads almost 2 years ago. I do not walk down a hallway or across a field without thinking of the ones that took the same steps in the same place before me.

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  7. Very sad to see them dwindle.

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  8. Buttons...If I can ever find the pictures on my computer, and if I can get my computer to work long enough to download them, I have a similar post. Only it's a bunch of old farms that were bought out to build a new highway. So sad. You aren't the only one that thinks of these things.

    Cindy Bee

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  9. It is very sad that we are losing so many small, family farms across North America and as they go, it seems that the idea that you have to WORK to provide for your family is going along with them...

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  10. No, I think it is incredibly sad... we are losing a way of life and our heritage... xo

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  11. So sad. I did a post about this earlier this year also, as it's happening here in Missouri as well. We can only hope that old house lovers or old barn lovers like us buy the property and preserve the history. I wish I were rich. :-)

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  12. I think it is very sad. So many of the farms are part of big business now and that is extremely sad.

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  13. Buttons, it is the land that is valuable. Farms are selling really high right now and all for the land. Mega farming! Use to be the farm sold for the house and four acres, now it is the land less the house. Also people don't want to renovate and update these old houses, with electrical, plumbing, huge roofing projects etc.

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  14. Yes this is beyond sad!!!! Now as I am getting older and more sentimental...I treasure seeing the vintage older homes and hope they can be saved.
    Laurie

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  15. It is sad to see family farms disappearing and century homes being bulldozed for new subdivisions.

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  16. It is becoming more and more difficult for farmers to stay in business. Our country has so many government regulations that increase the cost of the product, not to mention the cost of feed! Our products may be safe, but they are more expensive, and we allow less safe or even unsafe products from other countries to be sold here.

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  17. Great photos ~ sad event ~ (A Creative Harbor) ^_^

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  18. We have two barns that are over 100 years old. The key is keeping a good roof on them. Those who don't, eventually lose them to long term weathering. Around here, we do have some run down barns, but I do not see a lot of farms for sale.

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  19. it is definitely becoming the norm, sadly.

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  20. How sad. I know, I for one depend on the farmers in my area to grow what I can't or don't. We too are seeing less farmers in our little area. It is a hard life and I am sure the younger generation is looking for an easier way.

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  21. No, I think anyone who lives in a rural area is seeing it. It is so very sad. It is such a wonderful part of history that is going to be gone without a trace one day I am afraid.

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  22. It is so sad to see those beautiful old farmsteads disappearing, taking their stories with them.

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  23. It IS so sad to see all these family farms, and family businesses of any sort, being lost to bad economy and eaten up by big business.

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  24. it's beyond sad and it's happening everywhere!!

    thanks for all your love and support b, we are really doing just fine!!

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  25. So true. Big Ag has turned food production into a huge business wiping small farmers out of their way.

    It is heartening to me to see farmers like Joel Salatin and Goeff Lawton helping the upcoming generation of people who want to work the land.

    With vision like theirs and new farming methods it seems very possible that small farming is slowly making a come back.

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  26. It is very heartbreaking. I do like to attend auctions from time to time, but it makes me sad to think why the auction is happening in the first place.

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  27. Very sad sign of these difficult days we are living in.

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  28. It's so sad. I'm with you on that. Although I and most of my relatives live in the city, my grandparents were farmers, so I highly respect those that make their living off the land. It's sometimes a brutal life, but so noble and rewarding. God bless those going through difficulties.

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  29. i'm right there with you...sad indeed :(

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  30. Here they don't last too long as we have a lot of 'tree changers' in this country and the city folk buy them up to restore and live in. Sad to see them decay and no body loves them. Maa

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  31. Yes, I am sorry to see these old homesteads being sold off and great traditions coming to an end.

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  32. No, you're not! It's horrible, watching farm land being eaten up for stuff we don't need. What the heck are we going to do when we need FOOD? At the rate we're going, we'll be totally dependent upon corporate agri-farming and foreign farmers.
    Dear God in heaven...help us all!

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  33. This is indeed true, and so very sad. I've noticed this happening a lot more over the past year, than I ever have before. One in particular that I watched, as things went downhill little by little. Then it was completely abandoned. I am hoping that somehow things can turn around.
    Wishing you a beautiful weekend!
    xo.

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  34. These are beautiful photos preserving a part of our history. It is sad.

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  35. That farmhouse looks very much like my Grandparent's farmhouse, years ago in New England. These things are happening all over, but also young people are buying them and fixing them up. I see that, too, and it is so encouraging. I do hope we pull out of this recession soon so this can stop happening. So sad. xx

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  36. Button,

    Thanks for coming by. It really is sad that this is happening to so many farms and sad that family farms are having so much trouble making it. I'm a city girl, but only a generation away from farmers and I had lots of opportunity to visit other family on theirs. Maybe that's why I'm a gardener.

    Yael from Home Garden Diggers

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  37. I am always saddened by such neglect...and wonder WHY. The kids or grandkids just moved away and the house or barn wasn't needed anymore. So so sad!

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  38. It's so sad to see and happening everywhere. :(

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  39. Oh, very sad things. I do not know why these things would happen.

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  40. It is indeed a real shame. It is such a gorgeous house too. I hope somebody will buy it and show it some love.
    I feel for the previous owners - a sad day for them.

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  41. I would LOVE to take on a project like this...refurbishing an old farm and/or barn.

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  42. we had a tv at night while working this week...and I had a hard time with one of the shows, called "storage wars"...its a show where there is auctioning off items in storage units to the highest bidder... and the winners are in it for the money. Someone lost their things/heirlooms/baby things because they couldnt pay storage fees...

    nd now this TV show is making fun of them; the highest bidder makes jokes about the items, throwing away things they call "junk", looking for $$$heirlooms that only mean $$$ to them. So sad...

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  43. I am right there with you in feeling the sadness and loss of these great homesteads! They are prolific in our rural area. The 'new' generation doesn't want to farm; they are going to the big city...bleh!

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  44. Yes Buttons it is so very sad..... Your post touched the many good hearts here........ Our heritage...........so important.
    Fondly, Rain

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  45. Your post makes me teary eyed.
    Lovely prose!
    It is sad to think it happens as often as it does and what is most sad is the people involved. To change their lives from everything they've known is the sadest.

    Sorry I'm so late returning Rural Thursday comments. Thanks so much for your visit this week.

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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