Monday, July 15, 2013

Admiration while Learning!

The desire of knowledge,
like the thirst of riches,
increases ever with the acquisition of it.
Lawrence Sterne


Standing here at this auction with the friendly family bidding on items they love in the foreground  I find myself draw to this crate with this braided rag rug and its multiple colours. This tells me a story about a generation of people who wasted nothing, something we can all learn something from. You valued those items of clothes you owned, that is why you had “Sunday go to meeting” outfits, the “Farm work” clothes, “play” and “Every day” which would include aprons to cover all those precious clothes. It was not like you could just run out to a store and buy something new. You invested your very hard laboured money and time buying then making fabric into everything you wore so you tended to put a higher value on it. In other words you appreciated those things much more, so that when these clothes were worn out you found a way to recycle them into something else useful and needed. Tear them into strips and braid a rug to cover those cold floors being one way.


I have always appreciated the time and ingenuity that went into these we may call simple items. We are a generation of throw it out and buy new because we can, I am guilty of that myself, why just the other day I threw a pair of cotton socks in the trash, there were three holes in them where my toes were peeking through but I thought nothing about it because I knew some where someone was making more of them every day and they were easy to find. The people before us had no choice and had to make it work.

This auction had so many interesting things…. I think this may be a yoke from an Ox but being I have never seen an Ox nor a yoke other than on the TV I clearly am guessing.


I must tell you a story about and older gentleman who made an impression on me after I returned from photographing that barn. I was talking to a young woman who was a family member and telling her how to find my Blog and that if she Googled Buttons Thoughts Blog I would be the first hit, so she could read what I wrote about her family’s farm and auction. Uncle Hank (not his real name) looks up at me from where he was sitting on his lawn chair watching the action and says “I have no idea what language you are speaking”  we all laughed and his niece assures him "Don’t worry Uncle Hank I do."


Uncle Hank (not his real name) on knowing I had just came back from the barn asked “Did you see the bore holes in the barn beams?” and I explained that I never went into the barn but knew what he was talking about as I had seen holes in our beams in our barn with the piles of sawdust lying just below. He looked at me and told me “You better take care of that because that is the larvae of the Barn Bore Beetle eating their way out after being laid by the Beetle” I was shocked I thought those sawdust piles were created by ants but honestly what do I know about barns and beams? He continued “Make sure you get a professional not a fly by night guy, someone that knows what they are doing.” I will, I told him. I was later told by another member of this large friendly family that Uncle Hank (not his real name) was a Pest Control Specialist, a real professional. I always learn something new at these auctions and usually from the older persons in the crowd. They have so much information to share; all we have to do is ask and listen.




My necessary search on Google explains the Wood Boring Beetle and how destructive it is. It is sometimes known as the Powder Post Beetle. My generation seems to always Google things they do not understand and hopefully find the information we seek. The combination of Uncle Hank (not his real name) and Google makes for an excellent combination of knowledge. While I was searching for this I wondered if Uncle Hank would understand my need to do this search for something he understands but I do not.

I actually loved this auction and the incredibly friendly family I met here. I learned a thing or two about unknown things, I seen things I never seen before and I think I may have talked a language someone did not understand but I am sure Uncle Hank (not his real name) may have someone show him this Blog Post so he may understand and hopefully he will know that I enjoyed chatting with him and am grateful for the valuable information.


Who knows…..maybe someday some curious person in the generation after the next or the next will be reading these words, seeing these photos or talking with my friendly relatives (the ones born long after I am gone) and possibly they will learn and admire the things they never knew about the things that I knew and the different language I spoke. That Blogger language and that storytelling that people did not understand either, and just maybe someone will care as much as I do about the long gone past of things they did not know. This is what history is all about, saying and sharing what makes you who you are and hoping someone will get it.


Thanks to all the friendly family I met I truly loved your farm full of history, it was so generous of you to let me share these photos with everyone  so we will never forget about all who came and worked so long and hard on this land.


Later

37 comments:

  1. I love visiting these auctions with you and seeing some of the items that you get to see. I would be just like you and wonder at this and that and want so much to understand their lives. This is most of the reason why I am a genealogist and historian!

    ReplyDelete
  2. These auctions fascinate me. I love the way you explore and talk with the people there. I'm finding more and more that I enjoy hearing the stories of people I've never met before. I also love the way people used to value their possessions and remake them into something new once it can no longer be used for its original purpose.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love finding rag rugs and old quilts.
    Thanks for taking us to the auction :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. You find the most interesting things...and stories...at these auctions! The braided rug caught my eye right away. I have one that my great Aunt made years ago...love them!

    ReplyDelete
  5. You are truly a modern day historian, my friend, and generations from now, people will be reading your posts.

    I love rag rugs- my mom made them when I was little, and I helped her with a few.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Love this post and I've missed you. I've been extracting honey and just haven't had much time for blog reading. So catching up this morning as I stare at the pile of green beans my neighbor traded me for honey. uughh...gotta start snapping. Did you get the rag rug? I love it. And I love Uncle Hank not his real name. You must have a lot of farm auctions in your area. I hope they are just wanting to get rid of stuff and not all of these people are losing their farms. I love your stories.

    Cindy Bee

    ReplyDelete
  7. Once clothes could be mended and mended, but a lot of today's clothes won't stand that for they don't wear well.
    There are those boring creatures in some areas of Australia.
    Hope you are ok...Hugs M xxx

    ReplyDelete
  8. I think you need to get some blog business cards made to hand out at these auctions! :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Miss B,
    I like your thoughts on continuing history, through written word, blog or stories. I shared an old blog post on Facebook about my Grandpa (Today would have been his birthday). I wish I could share more of his life stories.

    I am younger than you and the really young ones speak a different language than I. lol! I am at that age where college students look like they should still be in high school and some of the new professionals look to young to be practicing. At the same time, I am sure many look at me and think she's over 30?

    ReplyDelete
  10. I don't know how you do it, but you can make something old and not so nice looking.... You make them look amazing. Must be your great camera skills.

    ReplyDelete
  11. That was so interesting and thank you for it.
    When I was young (back in the 1950s) it was often that adult clothing was cut down and made into clothes for the kiddies. I remember using a pair of dark green gaberdine slacks to make 2 pairs of little trousers for my son. Very little was wasted. Knitted jumpers were undone and made into rugs or jumpers for little ones. Pity today that it is a throw aways society who is always wanting more and more of something new that they can then throw away without a second thought.

    ReplyDelete
  12. i ditto what terri said! i'm going to make a rag rug with the tshirts my kids have outgrown, the ones i can't part with like sports and school shirts....i'm thinking of making it into a big-ish square and hanging it on the wall...that just came to me when i saw that rag rug! i should get on that asap!

    ReplyDelete
  13. my father crocheted rag rugs for many years.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Wonderful post and photos ! It is true we all take things for granted and throw away way to much in knowing we can replace it so easily ! On the farm my mum made my clothes as a child made her aprons , table cloths , dish cloths , towels you name it and darned our socks if they had holes in them . Mum was a seamstress who came here from England after the second world war ! I just wish I picked that craft up as now a days things aren't made that well and they cost a to much ! Slowly I find people going back to they way things were done in the old days where you did it all your self and grew your own food , one it is healthier and two it is cheaper in the long run ! I to love hearing of the old days with the farmers story's around here that have lived through thick and thin . Thanks for sharing . Have a good day !

    ReplyDelete
  15. I love those old rag rugs! It's always fun to go to the farm auctions with you guys! :)

    ReplyDelete
  16. I love your stories of the auctions and the interesting things you see and the interesting stories you hear. You are offering a true gift to these people, to listen to their stories and pass them on.

    I have an old quilt that includes pieces of my grandmother's dresses. I love how everything used to be used, nothing wasted if it could be helped.


    I have a yoke similar to that that my dad left me. I think it could be used with cows too. Not sure but maybe horses too?

    ReplyDelete
  17. AHHHHHHHH! I know I would be running around inside your barn, on my hands and knees at times, examining the saw dust and exit/entry holes on the beams...you should have seen me when we had the flying ants in our house LOL I have them identified and could only breath easy after I realized they were harvester ants and they only ate seeds...

    love your visiting auction stories always... and I LOVE THE Picture of your hero on the ladder in your header - that is so artsy - id get that one in canvas at popart for sure...

    ReplyDelete
  18. Looks like you had a good time at this auction! Heck, seems like you have a good time at every auction! :) I love the braided rag rugs. My pioneer women group made some last year. Although I don't know how to knit, so mine ended up being a bowl rather than a flat shape because I kept skipping a row or something!

    ReplyDelete
  19. You are doing a good work when you document and preserve what you find at these old farms. Also the record of your daily life is valuable to your readers and should be priceless to your family for generations. That grindstone looks to be in pretty good shape. However, I liked the kind that wasn't hand cranked but was run by peddle power.

    ReplyDelete
  20. So very many interesting finds at this auction! It was fun exploring all the treasures with you.

    ReplyDelete
  21. You are so generous. Thank you for sharing all these things with loving wisdom - All these stories are important - they are the actually fabric of our own lives . . . those braided together rags - making us stronger -

    -g-

    ReplyDelete
  22. what a great story...i wish everyone could enjoy these wonderful tales!!

    really special pictures today, it's so fun to see what you see!!

    ReplyDelete
  23. You always meet the most interesting people!

    ReplyDelete
  24. I love visiting your blog. I have been catching up, I especially love the auction post about Uncle Hank (not his real name!). This generation really does have a language of it's own. I can't imagine what words will be introduced as technology evolves...
    My grandmother-in-law thought googling was something naughty! LOL

    Love your stories, always brightens my day!
    xo Cindy

    ReplyDelete
  25. You make these auctions really come to life Buttons. I so love learning and enjoying all you share about them.

    ReplyDelete
  26. B,

    When going to auctions you never know what you'll find and the history behind it.

    I love those old rag rugs, they work very well on the floor in kitchens and next to fireplaces.

    ReplyDelete
  27. You always discover such wonderful treasures at those auctions, not just in the goodies you find to buy and photograph, but in the people you get to meet. Thanks for taking us along with you! (So to speak...)

    ReplyDelete
  28. I would have had a ton of fun at that auction. Such cool stuff and the people sound great. I always enjoy when you take us along. Good luck with those borers. I wonder if that is what has been attacking my bench.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I have never, ever been to an auction but I've always wanted to. They sort of make me nervous. Or maybe I'm just a little apprehensive. I, too, enjoy the fun things that have a story. (And I'm going to get caught up on your blog now-more than a week without internet, I'm dragging behind!)

    ReplyDelete
  30. I would like to extend a thanks to you (blogger extraordinaire)and Uncle Hank (not his real name) for the timely information on the little piles of sawdust... My beloved little farmhouse has some....and now I am armed with some very helpful knowledge. :))

    ReplyDelete
  31. I am comforted by the Uncle Hanks in this world. Younger generations need to know that life existed before computers and cell phones, and that people were very resourceful with what they had. And B-don't feel too bad about your socks. It seems that very few products these days are made with a high enough standard of quality to warrant fixing:)

    ReplyDelete
  32. I have never been to one, but you sure make them sound dreamy.

    ReplyDelete
  33. So much history and so much to learn! What a great experience. I love that barn!

    ReplyDelete
  34. Well my friend, you have some unique gifts too. Drawing people to you as you share the world that surrounds is pretty awesome... I think.

    ReplyDelete
  35. I love how you appreciate the past and how the generations before us had to live. A whole story in a rag rug! We do need to appreciate the 'old ways', as we can learn much from them, still. xo

    ReplyDelete
  36. I like seeing all the fantastic old things you see at farm auctions - so many treasures!

    ReplyDelete
  37. (not my real name) ;)

    your story reminds me of darning socks by turning them inside out on a light bulb, but now lights aren't even bulb-shaped.
    i enjoyed the wisdom of uncle hank. the next generation won't be saying "your grandfather taught me how to do this" but instead "i watched a youtube how-to video." which is kind of sad.

    keep sharing your wisdom, buttons! *hugs*

    ReplyDelete

The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

Please do not copy my work. If you like it let me know I am sure we can work something out. Copyright is in place.