Monday, July 22, 2013

Hot Mechanic on Duty!

Behold the turtle. He makes progress only when he sticks his neck out.
                                             James Bryant Conant


Our round baler was bought brand new in 1985 and yes as I write this I know some of you are snickering because you have not even been here that long yourself. We have had numerous chances to buy a new baler but frankly we like this old one, it is familiar and easy to fix if something goes wrong, it has nothing to do with the $25,000 price tag on the fancy new one at the dealers, well maybe a little.

It is somewhat comforting to know by a slight change in the familiar sounds coming from this baler that something is wrong, also comforting to know My Hero and I can fix whatever that may be. Yes indeed in farming there are always going to be times like that even with that expensive new equipment. I love this baler I have been baling since it was about five years old and when I in a moment of weakness and guilt during an extremely busy time on the farm learned how to use it, making it my forever job.


This brings me to last night, yes I said night because it was so darn hot outside after My Hero came home from work we waited as long as we could for the temperature to drop so we could go work in a shady spot in the barnyard. This little adventure started as 6:30. My Hero left the house first while I cleaned up the dishes and such, you know what I mean. I threw some shorts on and an old T-shirt knowing it would be covered with grease when I came back. By the time I walked out into the great wall of heat and dragged myself down to the barnyard My Hero had parts littered all over the yard. Belts, bolts, and rollers which are very heavy were waiting to be put back on. The hoses connected to the air tools were wrapped over and under that old baler and I could see My Hero sitting inside the baler trying to get another roller off, with the door propped up with a post. This always makes me nervous but I know he knows what he is doing. I jump in knowing this was going to be a long process to get it all back together and sort out that noise that was coming from we think a bearing in the roller.

A worn bearing in the baler does not sound too bad but I learned the hard way that if you have a worn bearing creating heat in a machine full of hay some sparks or in some cases pieces of hot metal will most likely fall into a field of raked waiting to be baled hay and create a huge fire in the middle of nowhere at your neighbours requiring you and your neighbour to do lots of raking with hand rakes moving rows of raked hay while fretting and waiting for the friendly Firemen with water trucks to show up, yes sometimes you learn things the hard way. That taught me to always listen to the sounds of the baler. I learned never to ignore that grinding sound again while you are baling alone and your Hero is far away at his real job.


I have always helped My Hero with the repairing of machinery because honestly there was just the two of us and that is the way it is. I know the size of wrenches and sockets and names of most every kind of tool, sometimes I wish I did not but it is nice spending time together working on something that we need done, a date night like no other. OK let us be honest here I DID enjoy that but now I find it frustrating.

 For one thing my eyes no longer see in the dark like they used to and that flashlight we ended up using for the last hour did not help one little bit it only created an illusion that I could see and those shadows did not help anything. I could not see the size stamped on the side of the assortment of sockets lying on the ground meaning I handed My Hero the wrong one time after time. I could not get the bolt in the hole on the outside of the baler to tighten and hold the heavy roller in place which My Hero was sitting inside the baler holding up waiting patiently and no doubt struggling while I tried over and over again. My shaking hands because it was so darn hot and probably a little dehydrated making it even more difficult. I listened to My Hero’s soothing reassuring voice being very patient with me knowing these jobs are getting more difficult for me every year and him knowing I am the only help he has. I am not sure if this is the Fibromyalgia’s fault or just my age, but it makes me mad. OK enough of my whining.


I watched as the sparks flew from the grinding of a piece of required welding that had to be done and was happy I had brought my camera, this I can do, take photos and run to get a bucket of water just in case. We were getting step by step closer to putting all those parts lying strewn about back where they belonged. I brushed the dirt off of My Hero’s cheek while we were both now inside that baler and he flashed me that famous smile while I watched the sweat beading on his forehead.

 My Hero finally suggested using a hole punch in one of the bolt openings to hold the other bolt holes in place while I screwed those bolts in and fairly quickly the rollers one by one were back in place. We then started replacing the belts and between the two of us with our squinting eyes and our hands working together stringing that lacing back through the belts we knew we were now almost done. It was very dark now and I struggled to see the tools on the ground, but just like that My Hero closed the last door panel and it was finally done.


 My Hero picked up those tools and packed everything up while I made my way to the house in the dark. I opened up the door clicked on a light and looked at the clock on the wall it was 10pm. It is still very hot outside even with that blazing hot sun now replaced by the bright beautiful slip of a moon.

Well with another date night finished I smile knowing I still have the hottest mechanic on duty.

Later





47 comments:

  1. Oh my gosh...I'm just reading this thinking about how my Shug would probably not have the patience your Hero has, at all. We learned early on we do NOT work well together most of the time. We just don't. We know that about ourselves, and we are building a house! He does his part, I do mine, and when we have to work together we know we have to have patience. And you are right, this heat does not help. Today it's raining outside, and I'm hoping the hot weather breaks a bit.

    Cindy Bee

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  2. 😄 I have a hot mechanic too!
    I think it is a blessing and a curse to be able to fix everything!

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  3. You wrote so beautifully of the partnership it takes to operate a farm. Many have no idea all the work that is involved. You have to love it or it doesn't work.

    I would say you have a fine PAIR of mechanics.

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  4. Handy hot guys are great to have around! ;)

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  5. Sounds like the 'hot mechanic' has a 'hot mechanics helper' lol.

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  6. Hmmm...I just might have to challenge you on that. Here I was thinking that I had the hottest mechanic on duty :)
    Have a great day B. You and yours stay safe.

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  7. I felt like I was right there, watching you all fix that, with your great descriptions. And 1985 doesn't seem like that long ago...

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  8. This story reminds me of my husband as he endeavors to repair the few items of machinery - mostly lawn and garden related - whenever they malfunction. Not an easy task, that is certain!

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  9. You wrote this so well. I can just picture your Hero, patiently working on the baler, and you, trying to help him, like a second set of hands! You two are so good together! Hope it's baling fine today!!

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  10. Ha! We know all about old balers. Ours is from 1966 and is known to break down a time or two. But a few repairs and it just keeps chugging out the hay.

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  11. You and your Hero make an awesome team! I love that when you looked over at him, he was flashing a smile!

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  12. you two make a fine pair. :)

    yikes on the fire lesson learned the hard way!!

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  13. I remember our hay baler...it made quite a racket...Dad had to work it on too many times. My family has a old joke..."if you want to fix something, just get some baling wire". I still laugh about it now!!

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  14. It's good to have a good man who can do the mechanical work, and you too, wonderful...and great satisfaction when all is done.
    I was amused about the fire because of the bearing not done :)
    Hugs M xox

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  15. Oh, you and your Hero work so well together. That really is a date night. :-)

    My husband is very handy, too, and likes to fix things himself. I'm not much of a helper, but I'm pretty good at holding things in place while he nails or bolts or whatever he does.

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  16. B,

    The two of you make a great pair of mechanics and a mighty fine couple.

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  17. And your hot mechanic has the hottest assistant mechanic!

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  18. you wild Canadian woman you - let the guy get some rest, will ya? ;)

    This is like the bext explanation ever of what goes into haying each year. Definitely a wash, rinse repeat type of thang'

    and once again you write about it so well!!!

    Now do you know anything about replacing mower teeth without having to pull the whole dang strip? ;0

    xoxox


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  19. You two give "hot date" a whole new meaning. ;-D

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  20. Nothing like old machinery. You got it right. You know every little creak that should be there! On Saturday, we went to a fire started by a baler. I don't know what happened. But it was fully engulfed when we got there. They were able to pull it out of the field though. They don't want a new baler! They liked the old one! Old like from the '60's!

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  21. Wow - I loved this post. My man is a bit like your hero and can mend anything, which I love! So good to have a man like that. Also, love the industry with which you guys treat things - mend, not buy etc. I love the whole farming lifestyle, it is so fantastic to read about and long for!

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  22. My Dad is a mechanic, and I have fond memories of many nights in the garage (or on the side of the road, squinting by flashlight) working to get things fixed so they could be used the next day. I was not as enthusiastic then as I could have been, I'm afraid, but Hubby just bought a project car to start fixing up, so we now have time to perfect our "hot dates" on non-essential fixing before we get our own farming equipment that will require urgent team fixing.

    May the rest of the haying season pass without the need for more moonlight fixing!

    Hugs!! Mandi

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  23. I delight in a good love story. This one reminds me of one begun 45 years ago, in which I still participate. My compliments and admiration. Following.

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  24. One reason I love to read about your day is that the love between you and your Hero shines so strong through everything you do, everything you write about. It is a wonderful thing to behold, dear Buttons.

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  25. you two are just so cute, and hot stuff too, lol,

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  26. A sweet testament of love and devotion, Buttons. Partners in the true sense of the word! It's good that you have such a 'hot' handyman around to fix all of life's problems.
    When Mt. St. Helens erupted I lived in Oregon and we had about an inch of ash fall. My brother in law worked his father's big farm of wheat and ran the combine. He told us that all of the bearings in every piece of farm equipment had to be replaced due to the ash wearing them down. It was like fine sand paper. Farming is never easy, is it? xo

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  27. I hope it all works good for you now ! As I was raised on a farm my dad taught me to listen to the equipment we used and how to fix it ! Just one of those things you have to lets say man up and learn to survive on a farm ! Our lawn tractor we got new in 2009 is having a bit of a prob it no longer takes hills, flat land is ok still I told Papa who is some what mechanical not as much as I as I have always been the tomboy and tampered with engines hehe that it could be low on trany better know as transmission fluid as going up the hill forces whats left to tip it away from where it needs to go there fore not getting enough to give it the juice to take the hills ! Well I was right WOOHOO ! Thanks to my dad I knew that lol ! I used to drive the baler and combine when on the farm at harvest time ! It's wonderful having a handy man around isn't it ? Thanks for sharing . Have a good day !

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  28. I popped by my neighbours to pick up some eggs today. My heart aches for him as yet another piece of haying equipment has broken down. He inherited his fathers farm and equipment about ten years ago. He had a serious farm accident about five years ago that left him permanently stooped and aching. Honestly, I don't know how much longer he'll be able to keep at it. The horses have already gone...

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  29. What a great pair the two of you are!

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  30. What a wonderful post. My hubby is a "hot mechanic," too, and I love that he's so talented at building and repairing stuff, but he and I don't always work well together. If I were having difficulty doing something, my hot mechanic would have gotten a teensy bit hot under the collar. It's great that you and your fella work together so well.

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  31. Great post! I fix most things in the house, hubby tells friends and family that I am mechanically inclined. Nice to see two of you work well together.

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  32. our balers are both pretty aged as well, but they work, and you will be making hay a long long time before you could pay for a new one these days .My dad has rebuilt an awful lot of machines in his day, and still helps hubby and my brother in law with repairs here

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  33. It is refreshing to hear how you adore your hero and how patient he is. I hope you have 100 more years together fixing hay balers.

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  34. Even though it is winter in Perth and quite cool I warmed up dramatically just reading about all that hard work the two of you did repairing the baler. It is so amazing how the two of you work so well together and have an understanding of each other.
    Seems a farmer's work is never done, regardless of time of day or type of weather. Hope it cools down for you soon.

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  35. I meant to ask..just hot is hot where you live.?

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  36. It's heroic - having a "day job" and working a farm . . So many people need to handle things this way . . .

    I LOVE the way you tell the story.
    (Can't thank you enough for your blog.)

    My uncle (of blessed memory)also worked a farm & a "day job." he always told me it was much easier to repair the trusty "Older" vehicles . . . they were simple and straightforward . . the computer equipment was pricey - in more ways than one. i think you & your hero are wise . . and wonderful.

    love & love,
    -g-

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  37. i have a handy hottie too!!

    i always tell the hubs, as long as we're together, it's date night!!

    it's wonderful to keep the "fire" alive ;)))

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  38. He is a very lucky guy. Next time I yell for help having only two hands when I need three....

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  39. Oh, I love meeting you. I am about to post a little bit on my blog about Beth and I will follow you too. xo

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  40. I so understand wanting to stay with what is familiar. I agree. Sometimes bigger and faster isn't always better. I love the ending of your story. We are both very lucky to know what true love is. I see so many around who just don't get it. Thanks for the story.

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  41. I enjoyed reading about your date night. It sounds like you have a nice comfortable partnership with your hero. The kind that I imagine comes with years of working together.

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  42. What wonderful partners you make. It takes that kind of work together to get things done. Happy Summer to you and your hero.

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  43. my grandparents' hay fields surrounded our house and i remember many a night of grandpa or my uncles driving around outside my bedroom window after midnight. good thing haying and school are different seasons. :)

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  44. That week sure was hot!!! Love the image of the sparks!!!

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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