Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Butternuts, Bolts, Boots and Beauty!

One of the most wonderful things in nature is a glance of the eye;
  it transcends speech;
it is the bodily symbol of identity.
                             Ralph Waldo Emerson


It was early our holiday Monday morning and with many fields of hay down and heavy fog leaving wet dew covering the ground we knew there would be plenty of time to get some other projects done on the farm before My Hero and I would have to start raking and then baling the hay.

One project that I mentioned was that door on the sap house nestled back in the middle of the bush surrounded by those magnificent tall full of lush green leafy Maple trees that I have been thinking of and missing since spending a few moments there on Friday when the door crashed to the ground as I opened it to show our visitors from across the ocean the inside of this interesting structure. Usually, we would not have rushed to repair it but since we had the time this morning and we had to drive back to see the freshly cut field of clover back there anyway, we gathered up the materials we needed and headed there in the truck.


I was wearing my Pink Cadillac Boots to protect my feet from the wet heavy dew and the ticks that lie in wait in the long grass. I hoped with any luck at all there would be a chance to check out the bush I love while I was back there and I wanted to make sure I was prepared. The closer we drove to the trees the more excited I became, and then we saw it. I stepped out of that truck with those Pink Cadillac Boots that I have also missed and pulled my camera out and started gathering as quickly as I could the shadows and light that camouflaged the sap house this early morning. Oh, I have missed being back here.

After gathering those wonderful images and capturing them forever I put the camera away and became that assistant carpenter’s helper My Hero had hoped he had travelled back in the truck with. My exploring would have to wait till I was no longer needed. We picked up the door and My Hero started drilling with the cordless drill new holes for the hinges while I held the door.
As I listened to the grinding sounds of the drill and while helping My Hero put the new nuts and bolts through the hinges in the new holes through that old hardwood door I found my eyes hypnotized by the light that pierced the trees of green and danced across the forest floor where the tops of the dying May Apples were curled with brown edges and that bright sunlight cast more shadows below. I could feel that anxious feeling of running and exploring bubbling just below the surface.


When that last nut was screwed on that last bolt my job was finished. I quickly ran to grab my camera and tried to capture this dance before it disappeared. With the sound of My Hero banging on the tin and that sound bouncing through the trees then coming back to where it had begun it was letting the forest creatures know we were there. I continued to chase the dancing shadows and light while he worked away and I wondered if he could see this magic too. I noticed the ground littered with nuts and placed a couple of them in my pocket knowing My Hero could tell me what kind of tree they were from.


I could not believe it had taken me so long to get back among the trees and to notice the beautiful magic that happens back here, I had let life get in the way. My Hero picked up the tools and placed them in the truck as I said goodbye to the trees, the May Apples and those dancing shadows and light. We jumped into the truck knowing this job could now be crossed off that very long list and we headed back to the house to get our busy day started. I then remembered those green nuts I had placed in my pocket; I pulled them out and asked My Hero, what kind of nuts are these? “Butternuts” I knew he would know, he always knows.


I vowed to start more mornings like this; I know I can get through anything that life has put in front of me with those beautiful, captured images bouncing around in my head. I watched as My Hero kept looking in the rear view mirror as we made our way away from the bush and back to the house, he had a smile on his face and I knew that he could see that magic and loves it back here too. Back to work and back to reality.



After five hours of looking behind me and with my head tilted slightly to the left once again I smile as I sit here writing this knowing we are moving along slow but steady with that haying. Baler counter now 430.

Later.

33 comments:

  1. Life is so amazing and beautiful, we need only look around us to see it. You see it !

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  2. These are beautiful images of the light playing through the trees. I'm so happy you were able to take a few moments to enjoy!

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  3. You and your Hero work together so well! That's nice, that you had time to enjoy the beauty while you were working. Bale count 430...that's a lot of hay! How many do you hope to get?

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  4. Your pictures and your lovely descriptions are always so rich and lush. Thank you for showing us such beauty~

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  5. Just wonderful, B! I adore the sap house and all of the sunlight.

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  6. A hard days work with the land seems to have us appreciating it all the more. Glad to hear the bales are getting there Buttons. I know thoughts of you will drift in later as we as we are having a night out ~ Wednesday farm auction !

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  7. sweet few moments spent where you love. then working at what you love, too.

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  8. Oh, the light and shadows among leaves are some of my favorite things to watch, especially in early morning or late afternoon. I never tire of the colors and shapes. You had a GOOD day.

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  9. I'm glad to hear the pink cadillac boots came out of the closet for a bit. :-) It is lovely to be able to drink in nature once in a while. It's good for the soul.

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  10. Beautiful light and shadow shots B!

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  11. you must love your butternut trees - there is a disease that has gone rampant called Butternut canker and it kills every tree...and soon there will be none left - heres some management guide rules ~

    " 1# Retain trees with more than 70 percent live crown and with less than 20 percent of the combined circumference of the stem and root flares affected by cankers.
    Harvest dead or declining trees to salvage the quality and value of the wood, or maintain the trees in the forest for their wildlife value.
    Retain trees free of cankers with at least 50 percent live crown and growing among diseased trees. These trees may be resistant and have value for propagation by grafting or for future breeding. Efforts are underway to locate potentially resistant trees in native forest stands. Contact the USDA Forest Service North Central Forest Experiment Station in St. Paul, MN, for further information if you find a healthy butternut"

    from http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/howtos/ht_but/ht_but.htm

    collect the nuts, replant in isolated areas, cut the diseased ones and burn...and cross your fingers. and do what you are doing, and do well - take beautiful pictures to remember them by.

    btw we are having the week. no trip.

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  12. I was just thinking a couple of days ago about how I haven't walked on our land across the road since May. It's mostly woods and ponds and wildlife. You are right, life gets in the way. I have still been extracting honey. Very busy time of year for a beekeeper but I might just have to get up early tomorrow and take a walk. We have a may apple patch too!

    Cindy Bee

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  13. What a wonderful writer you are. I can picture that special place of yours and it makes me smile too. The photos are wonderful too and thinking about early morning dew....

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  14. I know that feeling well, B. Like you don't know what to do with yourself and you might just explode! Yesterday a cloud covered the sun enough so that the edges of the cloud seemed to be on fire with light. I just about went out of my head:)

    Thanks for such a lovely visit today! Hugs!

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  15. So well-written! You have described a wonderfully restoring spot to be. Enjoy it!

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  16. Beautiful pic with the light through the trees. BTW- what is a sap house? 430 bales! way to go! You are baling small bales or big bales?

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  17. I love how you've never lost your sense of wonder and love of adventure. I hope I never lose mine! :)

    PS - I have a giveaway on my blog today and it is open to residents of Canada! :)

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  18. You captured that magical dance under the trees just beautifully! Thank you for taking us along with you to the woods. I love the dark green of the forest with the shafts of sunlight coming through.

    So glad the haying is going well!

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  19. Beautiful scenes. As a boy I had to help hay at my dads cousins farms. Tough work for a novice city boy....:)

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  20. I love the light and shadow in your beautiful pictures! Feral's comment is very interesting. Are you going to try to save some of the nuts?

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  21. Feral's comment is also scary to think that ALL the trees might be lost!!

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  22. How fortunate to have thick stands of maples and other leafy trees to explore--especially in that low, glowy morning light. Thanks for the gorgeous photos. Good eye.

    Hope your butternut trees survive the disease Feral was talking about. It would be a sad world without them.

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  23. you did capture some beautiful light here, buttons! your hero must have the same patience as my husband. projects tend to take a little longer as i'm usually busy chasing the light. ;)

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  24. A delightful read, great photos.

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  25. what an amazing place B... I was transported there for a second...

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  26. Such lovely, golden light to make your chores more pleasant! I remember butternut trees from my childhood in New England. Here in Washington we have wild hazelnuts. I never get to harvest any, though. The squirrels always get them first! Glad you are having good weather for your haying! xo

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  27. I remember my Dad talking about butternuts, but Woodstock was just that little bit too far north for them...

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  28. It's satisfying to cross jobs off your list, isn't it? And so much the better that you also get to enjoy nature;s play of light and shadows along the way.

    430! YAY!

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  29. I know I've said this before but you really do have an ability to see the beauty in every day things and that's such an awesome quality to have my friend.

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  30. Great that you are getting haying done. Love the photos. Hugs M xox

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  31. Wonderful post. Made me feel like I was there and feeling the peace you did.

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  32. Your post always have me smiling. So nice to notice all the beautiful things in this world of ours.

    Hugs~

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  33. Always important to notice the little things as we work through our day. :)

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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