Monday, August 5, 2013

Time of Year; Take Time to Enjoy the View!

We should be courteous to a man as we are to a picture,
which we are willing to give the advantage of the best light.
                               Ralph Waldo Emerson


It is a holiday Monday today in Canada and to most of the Farmers I know that actually means nothing except to those ever increasing number of Farmers who work fulltime on and off the farm, this will give them three days of catch up without driving off to that job on Monday morning that brings in the money, three complete days of real farming especially if the weather co-operates.

We are still trying to get our hay done and My Hero tells me he saw the Mother Hen Turkey over across the road this early Saturday morning so he decided to walk the field and on closer inspection he found only an empty nest with broken egg shells, this could mean one of two things. The first one being the eggs had hatched and the baby Turkeys are now living and hiding in the massive soybean field behind and quite happy while the Mother Turkey explores our field for bugs. The second and more distressing reason would be that the Coyote we watched wandering around two days ago had found them and eaten the eggs. I am hoping it was the first one. I may or may not see those Little Taunting Turkey Babies; unfortunately life is like that sometimes. He is cutting that field at this very moment. 


We are not even half done our hay yet, Mother Nature teases us by giving us two days of sunny weather then she dumps rain in the night. The temperatures are cooler and we are now dropping hay onto a wet ground which requires more waiting time for it to dry, then it has to be raked and wait some more and then we hopefully get to bale. It is getting very challenging but we will get it done, we have to get it done holiday or not.


I find myself loving this time of year we call the harvest season, of course the corn is not ready but all this rain has pushed it to the sky to the delight of the Farmers around here after last year’s drought. I am standing looking at a beautiful field of corn and smiling as this particular Farmer who is farming in the middle of a town where people go about their business and I wonder if they even notice. A double strand of electric wire separates this farm from the town. I am pretty sure I am not the only one that can appreciate this division.




 I stood and watched as a combine harvested barley today and loved it. I stood and marvelled at the technology that has made life easier for our Farmers, it is a beautiful sight to see; we should take the time to watch. The straw resulting from this process is baled in the fields and shot into wagons waiting to go back to the barns where lucky cows will lay all winter on golden beds waiting for the Farmer to come to milk them in the morning everyday holiday or not. The nice fresh square bales of hay riding the roller coaster will keep these same cows munching and happy all winter long.


Oh yes every day of this holiday weekend while happy town and city people are at their campsites watching the sun set over a beautiful lake where they have played all the day on and in the water, there is a happy yet weary Farmer trying to beat the weather, somewhere not very far away combining into the night or baling hay hoping the weather will hold. They are probably not even thinking of those campers enjoying the fun times, just as much as those campers are not thinking of them. The Farmer just continues to work possibly dreaming of winter where things may slow down at least a little.


 This time of year is busy. These Farmers working in those fields you are racing by in your loaded cars and boats heading for the cottages provide for free..... beautiful round bales of green, golden square bales and dust pumping combines of red and green harvesting golden fields of barley for your viewing pleasure.


Remember to slow down and enjoy the views of their hard work. The work they are doing which will eventually provide you with what you need. Enjoy the beauty. Thank you, slow down and enjoy so that everyone will remain safe and happy.



Later.

37 comments:

  1. Once again a lovely insight into your life and the farming life as whole. Thanks once again. xx
    Modern farmers certainly are lucky with all the technology now available and it makes me hark back to the 1920-30s when my folks were potato farmers in our great southern area. Planting and digging was done by hand and it was back-breaking work. I was only 6 when we left the farm because of mum's ill health but I remember her talking about it when I was older. The hours were long and the work was hard with little let up and no holidays. Then of course there were the depression years to contend with as well. A farmer's life is never easy no matter which century it takes place in. There are always pitfalls of one kind or another including the weather.

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  2. God bless our farmers! My hat is off to all of them as well as my appreciation!

    I do hope the babies are ok.

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  3. The corn looks luscious. Amazing are those turkeys, lets hope they remain safe. Hugs M xox

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  4. Oh, I hope those baby turkeys are enjoying the soybean field and not the other option...

    You pictures are gorgeous! They could be magazine covers~

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  5. I always enjoy our visits . . (well, it seems like we have a chance to stop and share.)

    I was raised by a lot of families ' ' ' I had aunts & uncles that were farmers - (parents that were performing artists) - SO - your stories carry extra depth for me . . which is such a gift.

    Happy Happy Day to YOU!!
    -g-

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  6. Well said, Buttons, as usual! :) I hope you can enjoy a little bit of a holiday in the midst of baling hay. I know how hard that is...I must admit I am a bit jealous of those who actually get a day off once in a while!

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  7. a holiday and day off...you wouldn't know what that is would you! i hope those babies will be ok!

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  8. I hope the turkey babies are busy learning how to catch their own dinners!!!
    I love that image of the barley!!

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  9. i love seeing hay bales. and i love seeing combines. gives a good feeling.

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  10. I hope the baby turkeys have hatched and not been eaten. We had a racoon once attack our setting hen and eggs. :-(

    I always admire the farmers' fields when we drive by. It's a life I have loved as long as I can remember. Now-a-days even more so.

    I'm reading Joel Salatin's book, "Everything I Want to Do Is Illegal". The nightmare that bureaucrats have made for farmers is unforgivable.

    God bless the farmers who have enough love of farming and personal drive to persevere in spite of it.

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  11. Thank you for a lovely post, B. I remember how hard my dad worked as a farmer--no real days off during the busy seasons. There is something satisfying about seeing the work that goes into harvesting and the preparations for the winter.

    And here's a great big THANK YOU to you and your Hero and all the other farmers out there that provide for the rest of us.

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  12. Down here, the corn is already in...and the hay & silage mostly cut and baled too. I love riding past the freshly baled hay, it smells so good!

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  13. The barley looks beautiful.

    I sure hope the coyote didn't get them!

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  14. LOVE your photo of the barley!
    I love when they plant wheat fields in the area! Makes for a beautiful landscape!

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  15. Three cheers for our farmers! Most of us don't consider all the hard work that's gone into the foods we eat every day. Thanks for the reminder. We should never take all that hard work for granted.

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  16. I lived the farm life until I left after high school. It's something you never forget. It's got to be a way of life that you follow. There is lots that is satisfying about it.

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  17. I hope the turkey babies are ok! I know nature can be cruel, but I hope for the best :) Love the photos of the hay. Best of luck with all your work!

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  18. Oh gosh, I hope the coyote did not have turkey for dinner! I enjoyed your pics Buttons, I have always wanted to live on a farm.

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  19. thank you thank you thank you. As two farmers who work full time off the farm as well we often feel forgotten by media. radio's, TV all talk endlessly of "long holiday weekends " with traffic updates,boating reports and stories about "cottage country". We farm in an area ( a half hour from Sauble Beach and Port Elgin) often touted as cottage country and feel invisible toiling away in the fields or working late in the night Friday to have all our produce fresh and ready for Saturday mornings Farmer's market.It is so nice to have someone " see " how much work we do !

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  20. Oh, that rings so true. My hubbie has never experienced the stress of an office job and cannot understand the ways of the town dwellers. They, in their turn, do not realise that the beautiful countryside that they enjoy viewing or playing in, didn't get there by accident but by the diligence of the farmer working well before they get up in the morning until, sometimes, long after they've gone to bed. Each needs to be tolerant of the other and to accept that each has their place in the working of this game called life. As usual, my friend, your words have made me think and be glad for the life I have chosen......as...I'm sure...are you! Even with its strains and stresses! Joan

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  21. so poignant and a wonderful reminder to those not in the farming loop. i really love your wheat image. beautifully seen...

    "food essentials" ;)

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  22. Great pics. I hope ya all get your hay up. Love the pic with the hay going in the barn. We feed big bales, load with a tractor. Easy! HA! Beautiful skies ya all are having. Love the puffy clouds.

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  23. I've stopped on many bike rides to watch farmers working their fields. It looks like so much work to me - and yet, sometimes I envy them all the same. I really do appreciate all the hard work that goes into providing me with food!

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  24. So true, every bit of this post ! While we were at our place near Spokane, WA we noticed how busy the farmers were putting up hay fore themselves, for sale. We also watched a family of wild turkeys , 2 adults and at least 8 poults strutting into the woods on our acreage, and that made me happy.

    The seasons come and go, and farmers know life itself should be attuned to them, for life itself depends on it.

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  25. Well said B.
    We value the hard work that our Farmers over here in Australia put in too.
    Being at the whims of the weather must be so daunting at times.
    So glad you're getting those bales in.
    Cheers now :D)

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  26. ... oh, I hit the publish button too quickly.
    I do hope that Mother Turkey had decided to take her babies for a walk.

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  27. The farmers were in our back field taking the hay this afternoon. We were all out there watching them. I just love your farm pictures.

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  28. I have been enjoying your images. Hope you get the work done on the hay.

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  29. I always like seeing the hay bales instead of the rolls!

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  30. Well I hope you get your hay in soon. We have had some really good rains now but the hot weather and sunshine are back again. If we were still haying this would be the time of the year we would be at it. We never had a hay rack so I remember some years I would have to hand turn 10 acres of hay. That was after spending 2 weeks pulling all the beaver dams on the creek so the fields would dry out for haying. Then by hand picking all the bales up in our ton flat deck. There was never a better feeling then having all the bales in and look over the fresh cut fields. But there is no way my body could take doing it all the old fashion way anymore. So my hats off to those who still are farming. I sure hope you get to maybe see those baby turkeys of they did make.

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  31. One GOOD thing about staying home to work on the farm: you avoided the miserable highway traffic. :))

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  32. Great post-great commentary! You tell it like it is. Many Years ago we hayed our fields and after a few years we decided it was not worth it to us. Everytime it rained and we lost hay. Just a few acres and we only had horses so we opted to buy the hay. I surely respect you farmers. Stanwood is a small town and there are many cornfields butted right up to town. I love it.
    Hope them little turks are ok--you watch for them and let us know. MB

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  33. Putting up hay is hard business- that conveyor belt looks great- wish we had one of those! Nice post, Buttons!

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  34. Gorgeous images today b!! It is easy to eat our food and forget where it comes from. It's important to remember!!

    Some peeps roll the hay, others make the bales. Why is that?

    Fingers crossed for the turkey!!

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  35. Thank you for reminding us to stop and appreciate all the hard work that goes into our daily meals! A lovely description of what it entails! I do hope the turkeys hatched, but the coyote needs to eat, too. The circle of life reflected not only in farmer's harvesting their crops, but in nature, too. Hugs, xo

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  36. Farmers are the best.......
    Love those bales of hay and that grain blowing........
    And sitting in my camper on the lake I DO appreciate.....
    My husband and family were farmers..........
    Hard hard work........
    Hugs to you Buttons.......
    Rain :)

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  37. B-I thought of you yesterday. We passed by a truck loaded with beautiful hay-wondering where it was bound. Much of our local hay goes to Japan to feed race horses! :) xoxoxo

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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