Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Waiting, Watching and Wondering!

People like to imagine that because all our
mechanical equipment moves so much faster,
that we are thinking faster too.
                    Christopher Darlington Morley


It has been just over three hours, I am in a different field now but I watch as he swoops in from the last field and then he sits and watches with those piercing eyes following me from place to place as if he has something to say and does not know how to approach. This gives me comfort, a sense of not being alone, a little company while I work.

Sitting atop the highest tree waiting, watching and I imagine wondering as I bounce across the rows of dry hay which has me constantly twisting to watch ahead to where I am going then quickly turning and watching behind to make sure everything is going the way it is supposed to back there.

Suddenly that familiar streak of red flashes, that tail and his magnificent wing span of beauty catches my eye..... Swoop….. he has left his lookout in the trees and dives down to grab a mouse with his sharp unforgiving talons, that poor mouse that ran from under this nice dry hiding spot now exposed when the hay was pulled into the baler leaving the poor mouse now at the mercy of this Red Tailed Hawk. That Hawk who keeps an eye on me as I work. Maybe he did not have anything to say to me after all maybe he is just an opportunist. Maybe he is just that, a beautiful magnificent opportunist that keeps me happy as he entertains doing what he does while I do what I do. Entertaining each other while we work.


He soars back to the top of the highest Maple and now being camouflaged by the leaves and completely out of my sight he devours his prey while no doubt still watching me. I spot something on the ground as I stop to tie a now full bale, after tying the bale, I pull the lever and out it pops rolling on the slight hill, the door slams shut. I shift the tractor out of gear and put the emergency brake on, slow the throttle down. My legs having not really being used for those hours and only dangling from the seat make my toes tingle as I place them on the tractor floor. Opening the door and stepping out onto the step, they feel much like a rubber band stretched too far and ready to snap, as my feet jump off the step and touch the ground I steady myself by gripping the huge back tractor tire. Oh the fresh not air conditioned air is so wonderful. The smell of that fresh cut and dried hay fills my nostrils, I smile this is what it is all about.

The noise of the tractor is a little unexpected, a deafening sound of shear power and force, no doubt since I have not left the quiet hum of the cab for the last three hours and with that ear protection now removed and quickly tossed on the seat of the tractor blocking out everything my ears are now trying to escape this intense roaring, they start ringing, run… run. They loved only hearing those silly songs running through my head and spilling from my lips probably off key over and over while searching for the correct lyrics la la la, they protest this roaring that now pierces my brain. Ouch.

 I wobble across two rows of waiting to be baled hay and bend down to pick up my treasure, my very first Juvenile Turkey feather; it is in perfect shape and will fit with the collection I have jammed in the holes lining the front window of my tractor cab. Perfect.

I wobble back towards the tractor and notice something green sitting on the stubby sharp brown grass left after the row of hay had just slid into the baler; I smile at seeing a beautiful frog that had survived the baler and the talons of that Red Tailed Hawk which, lucky for the frog, could not possibly have grabbed the mouse and him. I pushed him towards the outside of the field towards the swamp hoping he will find a spot to hide. I stare up to the tree where I know he is sitting and waiting, watching, and wondering what this farm girl is all about.


Climbing back into the tractor I stick that feather into the hole and admire my collection, it makes me happy knowing that these little gifts have been left for me to find, getting me out of the tractor if only for a few minutes to remind me that which is truly important in this life. I shut the door blocking out that roar of the engine and I put those ear protectors back on shift the tractor into gear, adjust the throttle back to where it was and continue to follow the row of hay in front while twisting to watch behind making sure everything is going the way it is supposed to back there. I know he is watching. La la la.

Later



40 comments:

  1. You have so much wonderful nature where you live! I was wondering how your turkeys were faring.

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  2. What a way with words you have! There is a little hawk I see almost every day, nearly hidden in his tree. Love that you got the feather!

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  3. He has learned what activity in the field means.... Poor little mouse. It's hard when you are born to die.

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  4. What is it about hawks that make our hearts soar? xo

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  5. I've not had a lot of time to visit anyone lately. As soon as I get some of that time to myself again, I'm going to sit down and catch upon some of your much missed posts, Buttons. I pop in every now and then to make sure you're ok. Hugs Sue

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  6. A very good lesson in having fun while working. I love lesson days.

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  7. To this day, seeing a hawk brings out a child-like wonder in me. YOu brought a lot of it back with this post :)

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  8. I always love to see a hawk soaring and circling, it just screams freedom! Glad the little frog made it past the baler and hopefully made it to the pond. :)

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  9. B,

    Another beautiful post.

    Sitting up in the tractor cutting and baling hay must be very relaxing and refreshing at the same time. This gives you so many opportunities to watch mother nature as time passes.

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  10. i love that you stop to collect them. :)

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  11. Ah! A kindred feather collector! I have owl feathers in my office, hawk feathers in my truck, raven feathers here and there ;)

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  12. welll...you almost make haying...well... seem fun ;p

    baling this morning, yay! I will make sure I tell Mike that he should be looking for feathers ;)

    xoxo

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  13. Feathers. A good reason to stop for a stretch Love how you remain in the moment

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  14. You have such beautiful way with words, B, and I enjoyed this so much. :-) A soaring bird still thrills me, and I could imagine you and the hawk communicating with each other.

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  15. I love finding turkey feathers. I don't like to see a wad or em. But its so rewarding to find them.
    Oh those hawks LOVE the baling of the hay. And the seagulls. They love the grasshoppers!

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  16. Wonderful tale, buttons. I too love seeing the red tail hawks.

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  17. :-) I would've collected them, too!

    Pearl

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  18. Thanks for the reminder to take the time to "smell the roses".
    A lesson I frequently forget.

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  19. the perfect opportunity to get out and stretch your legs! *hugs*

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  20. I great excuse to stop for a moment, remove your ear gear and take it ALL in!!

    I adore the quiet of nature and a farm!!

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  21. You and Mr. Redtail have quite a symbiotic relationship. You open the way for him to find lunch and he keeps down the vermin so they don't overtake your farm. That's a good balance and the way things should work.

    LOVE the smell of fresh hay. I went for a bike ride this morning through fields and fields of baled hay and savored every breath.

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  22. It is great that collect feathers too.

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  23. Even here in the dry desert, I remember the smell of freshly cut hay. You write so well, I felt I was with you in that field under the watchful eye of the hawk.

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  24. Brilliant Story - Wonderful Treasure!

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  25. I'm glad you took the time to gather the feathers and that they make you so happy! What a gift to simple pleasures can be!

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  26. What pretty feathers! I have a nice feather collection going myself. But mine are mostly of the chicken and guinea variety :)

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  27. this a very descriptive post that reminds me of a time when I was a boy and saw this event play out many times. Since it was Sask. It was usally a Richardson's ground squirrel.(gopher)

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  28. What wonderful writing, Buttons! You have a real talent! I was able to form images in my mind as I read along.

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  29. Wonderful feather collection!!! Is this second cut hay? I thought you just finished the first cut...

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  30. You can almost make a day in your life sound romantic. Lucky girl!

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  31. Afer food, well someone has to keep the mice away :) if not the cats.
    Beautiful creatures are hawks.

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  32. Another absolutely delightfully happy story (except perhaps for the poor wee mouse). Thank you so much for sharing. It made my heart soar to be with you there in the field. I am confined to my house too much these days.

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  33. Cutting & baling hay is a hard job, a hot job ( usually ) and also a fulfilling job, especially for the livestock depending on the hay. That you are able to appreciate & observe all the wildlife watching you, and also the defenseless ones surviving the haying is a tribute to your observation and also your thankfulness for their being.

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  34. I love your stories- glad you found a new feather! That hawk found have a fiesta here- I have been mowing out in the field and I have stirred the mouse/rat population up- they are scurrying everywhere.

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  35. Another great story. He has learned that you are exposing his prey for him that is why he's looking at you.

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  36. I don't have fields to bale, but I do have birds to feed. I lay a line of feed in front of the shed each evening. Early in the morning I hear Momma Jamma and her friends out there arguing over the choicest morsels. Often in the morning, I have found they have left me gifts of feathers.

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  37. B-I love those little gifts in life too. Pretty feathers, and stones and shells. A perfectly ripened cherry tomato still warm from the sun. A hug from my daughter, and reading your wonderful writing. Life is good:)

    And seeing a hawk-that's pretty darn cool too!!

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  38. Beautiful feathers, Buttons and such a wonderfully told story of your day in the fields. I can smell the hay and imagine the hawk watching me. Love those hay rolls. Hugs xo

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  39. Very nice post B. I hope that you'll shoot that hwak some say. With your camera of course! ;-)

    Greetings from the Netherlands,
    dzjiedzjee.blogspot.com

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  40. Buttons,
    I don't get a chance to read your blog as often as I would like, but every time I do I am humbled by the wit and poignancy of your posts. You have a special talent; keep up the great work. Your photography is spectacular.
    Kev
    xo

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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