Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Thinking Way Ahead to Baling Hay!

Most people reason dramatically, not quantitatively.
                                             Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.


It is hard to believe when you look out your window and see mountains of snow and the temperature is once again a frigid -20 degrees Celsius that you could possibly be thinking of baler parts and the hot hazy days that come with the season of busy but as a farmer you have to. You did know I was not really finished with that story about my first auction of the season did you? There was obviously more than the scenic drive and those conversations between My Hero and brother Dios wondering what was to be seen, there is always something that peaks their interest in those newspaper ads that sets us off on these wild adventures.

This time it happened to be for My Hero, the words New Idea Hay Baler which is somewhat similar but not as pretty as the Case red one I use for hours and hours and hours during haying season and where I have been known to stop and pick up Turkey feathers, you know the ones. Oh yes if you own an old baler from 1984 that may or may not last through the upcoming long season and your wife (that would be me) loves it and understands it and will never let you buy a fancy new one you are always looking for an identical or close to it one for parts or if you are very lucky one that will work better than the one you now run. This is always on our mind; breakdowns in the middle of the season are not what either of us wants. Welding parts or broken pieces in the sweltering hot +40 degree Celsius heat, I know it is hard to imagine. This auction had one of them.


Brother Dios went to look at plows, this is something I tried once but apparently you have to keep going straight to keep the furrows straight or something and I am not capable of doing that, oh yes that was pointed out to me many, many years ago when my only attempt took a big curve to wherever. I am kind of happy about that; you do not want to get to experienced at jobs on a farm or that will become your forever job, this I know, a fact known by farm women everywhere. I did not even go look at those plows but I did find more interesting things to see at this auction.

There were horses tethered to buggies off in the distance driven here by an Amish farm family and that of course peaked my interest so I went to have a little chat with them, the horses not the Amish family, those nice gentlemen were too busy bidding on things that they also needed for the upcoming busy season off that wagon full of tools or something and I was positive they did not need to be interrupted by a farm girl who actually had no interest with anything selling off that wagon. Oh I love seeing horses and knew they would love seeing me; sure they were they kept looking at me.


I made my way down the lane and was careful not to spook them as they were all busy eating snow and one was nibbling on the cedar rail fence (maybe he was related to the deer in my bush back home). Now I am no horse expert but I did not think that was a good thing but what do I know. I did not approach them and kept my distance as they were not mine and I did not have permission. You know the kind of permission you would get if you were to ask “Permission to come aboard Captain” if you saw a ship or fancy yacht docked at the pier, or possibly The Starship Enterprise. So I did not ask that question “Permission to pet your horse Mr. Farmer” so I did not pet the horses even though I really would have liked to.

They did have a lot to say and since I was close enough to hear them I listened. Apparently they wanted to stay home this cold morning in bed surrounded by soft bedding and able to reach over to pull out green bits of hay from the manger and enjoy the warmth of the barn but their fellas were just like mine; they were interested in something they had seen in that auction listing too.


 I told you they were looking at me for a reason we had very similar stories. I reassured them the warmth of spring was coming and this auction was moving very quickly so we would all be home before we knew it and snuggled back in a nice warm house or in their case, warm barn. I knew that made them happy at the thought as they smiled and so did I. I bid goodbye and be well and headed back to see if we would be dragging anything home behind our truck. I wondered if my new horse friends would be pulling one of those hay implements that I had seen or maybe brother Dios plow which would have to be modified. Would they be pulling them behind them someday in the field with harnesses or maybe they had big Clydesdale work horse friends sitting back at their home in that warm barn resting till spring when the weather would warm up and the busy season would be upon us.

I found My Hero and brother Dios still checking out the baler and the plows and since the wagon load of things was now sold My Hero exclaimed they had seen enough and there was much to do back home so we headed off. There was nothing dragging behind the truck so I thought it was a good start to our auction season.


Brother Dios told me later on that he really would have liked to stay to see the plows sell and see what they were worth but please Do not tell My Hero he would probably feel bad, that is our little secret. I do know that next time brother Dios will probably drive and My Hero will have to leave before he sees what he came looking for, possibly another long ladder.

If you are wondering what auction I am talking about and you need a hat (toque), there is still time to enter the draw for a one of a kind hat possibly worn by Bossy2. Enter here.

Later




48 comments:

  1. Loved seeing the horses and buggies -- the Amish fanatic that I am. :)

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  2. Those buggies and horses are my favorites...forget machinery!...:)JP

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  3. love those amish buggies and the sweet horses!

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  4. I don't think I could plow a straight line either. I can't even dig a straight line in the garden...

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  5. i usually can stay pretty straight when i mown. so i am wondering if i could plow straight? i would love to try??! love the buggies. ( :

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  6. I love seeing Amish buggies and horses!! We have a of Amish in the town where I am from and I am always so fascinated by them and their life.

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  7. Plowing a straight line would be hard for me too, Buttons. How amazing that you left for home without a new ladder. ;))

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  8. I would have wandered down to talk to the horses, too!

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  9. Farm auctions are great fun but I'd rather wait for the warmer weather before attending lol.

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  10. Gosh, those horses and the buggies look great against the snow.
    Seems you have good fun :)
    Hugs M xox

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  11. Oh, how i enjoy your stories!
    I really like the horses . . and, my favorite bit is the part about nothing pulled behind - which might be a good beginning to your auction season . . .

    May we all warm up soon.
    love & love,
    -g-

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  12. You know what you're talking about! Don't get too familiar with ALL the farm chores...it's good to be helpful, but to not know how to do EVERYTHING! :) Spoken like an experienced farm wife! (I don't "know how" to start the tractor that pulls the manure spreader) I didn't know that you have Amish in your area!

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  13. B,

    The first auction of the season, and many more to come.

    Hopefully soon you'll be going to auctions when there's no snow and the temperatures are warmer.

    Blessings,
    Sandy

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  14. If we keep it up, we are going to have to get cars, to replace the parts on our cars, because they are getting so old! But, they are easy to use! No new-fangled phone stuff or video players and such in them.

    Cindy Bee

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  15. Love your conversations with the horses!!!!!!! :-)

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  16. We see horse and buggies driving by every day :)
    Amish horses are hard workers!

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  17. I can't say often enough how much I love your world. And this gal is dreaming of hay baling season, too.

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  18. I love the horses and buggies Buttons!!

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  19. Would be mighty cold riding in those buggies!

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  20. I love seeing the Amish horse and buggies as well as in the summers the Amish with horse and plows . We have a few Amish friends and enjoy visiting their farms ! Wonderful post and photos ! The temps here aren't to bad warming up to -7°C and sunny ! Thanks for sharing , Have a good day !

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  21. thats a cute little baler :)

    i wonder how many auctions Frostig went to...

    xoxo

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  22. Beautiful horses and love those Amish carriages. Their lifestyle fascinates me.

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  23. You picked our my favorite to talk to...horses.

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  24. Those buggies are like something from another age.
    Lynne

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  25. The buggies always are so picturesque, aren't they!

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  26. Love the buggies and cute horses! It does feel strange to do prep work for spring when there's still snow on the ground!

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  27. Grace, always a joy to visit, I had no idea that there were Amish in your area...beautiful shots.

    And if you say Spring is coming soon, then I will believe you...despite the foot of snow we got since yesterday.

    Jen

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  28. Hi B, loved your continuing auction story... you add those extra little bits that make any gathering come alive. I bet those horses loved your visit. You took such beautiful photos of them too :D)

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  29. This is exactly why I never learned to drive the tractor...I did not want to be the one that had to bushhog. HA Now the tractor is broke and I am Bad Boying like a boss all over the hillside with my lawn ower that was never meant to handle that size acreage. DH wants a new tractor, but the broken a/c stole that money. Oh well..life goes on. I do get the most fantastic up close look at snakes and rats out there on my mower. LOL!

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  30. Bawhahahaha! You are one of the best story tellers ever.

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  31. I just love the Amish. I would love to spend a year or so with them. But me being who I am, I would want to be out with the guys. lol.
    I love to hear the stories the old guys tells of haying with the old work horses. That would be so awesome to do. Hard work, but awesome.

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  32. I'm glad the predictions that horses would become a thing of the past with motorized vehicles didn't quite come true. Amish and cultures like them, plus people who just plane love horses will help keep those brave and handsome animals in existence.

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  33. You have the understanding of the auction process down to a tee. there's lots of talk and consideration . I know you talk to cows but I didn't know you were able to talk horse!!!!

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  34. I love visiting the Amish country near us and getting glimpses of their way of life. Loved reading about your conversation with the horses.

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  35. What beautiful horses. We seldom see horses here now and I do miss them. They used to pull carts that delivered our milk and bread and ice and all sorts of things in the good old days.
    I am going to so miss your snow when it has gone as seeing your pics do help to keep me cool.
    Living in Perth I can well imagine what it would be like welding machinery in 40+ºC heat. Workers here do it for months each summer.
    The Amish have always fascinated me and I recently saw a series on TV of young Amish who had gone to live in England for a while. One can only imagine the differences they found compared with their lives. Theirs is a world so apart from modern life and I am sure has much going for it.

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  36. This sounds like a fun day away from the farm. The horses probably were thinking abut their cozy home.

    Years ago when we had dairy goats our youngest son just never seemed to get the hang of milking them. Later on he admitted he deliberately didn't because he did not want to be expected to milk them every day. Smart kid. Now he is a successful farrier , horses were / are his passion. I should have learned that lesson about a few things too....

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  37. What a fun day. I think it would so awesome to look at all of the things that are there.

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  38. i love those amish buggies, i find them to be so interesting but i always worry about the beautiful horses. are they happy, are they tired.....are they treated well, love what they are doing?? i have watched them and it does appear that they work hard!!

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  39. I've always been intrigued by the Amish. I'm glad you included some photos of their horses and buggies today. :-)

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  40. I guess we all love the horses and buggies. Great shots!

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  41. Nicely written story and you didn't tell me that you were a horse whisperer. I bet you really are too. I hope you all got home to a warmer place.

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  42. Don't know how I missed this post, but glad I back tracked.
    I was wondering what the story was with the horses .
    I am amazed that the carts do so well in the snow. Those Amish are a rugged hardy group , as are their trusty horses.
    Glad you chatted them up and told them Spring was on the way .

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  43. I'm so glad the horses had blankies, that's too cold. We do have to trust that spring will arrive some day and be ready for it. I think preparing is one of the only things that helps us make it through.

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  44. I really want to go and see how the Jacobites live! Those carriages are adorable!

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  45. You tell the best stories!! One of my theories is "once people find out you are awesome, they expect you to be awesome all the time" so sometimes I hide the little things I am awesome at or try not to be awesome at things I don't enjoy (like cooking, though supper last night was sorta awesome).

    Glad you enjoyed the auction, even if the end came too soon for Dios.

    Hugs!!
    Mandi

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  46. Those are pretty horses. I noticed they have nice blankets, but no toques for their heads. Maybe that's what they were talking to you about.

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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