Monday, April 14, 2014

And then what happened…..

No story is the same to us after the lapse of time;
or rather we who read it are no longer the same interpreters.
                         George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans)


Now where did I leave you all hanging after this story? Oh yes now I remember….spitting rain, orphaned calf, flooded basement, a hopefully creative writing class and a bottle of sweet milk tucked in my vest. Down the lane we go in the tractor.

I could smell that sweet milk tucked in my vest as I drove down that lane, I hopped out of the tractor opened the gate with that bottle still tucked in my vest keeping it warm. Back in the cab I drove through, picked up two bales then drove back out, climbed down again and shut the gate. Back into the cab then drove over to the girls.

Sitting high in the tractor seat I could see everything going on. Some of the girls wandered quickly over to check out the bales so I proceeded to peel the outer layer off the bales one at a time and let it fall to the ground as bedding and moved the center parts of the bales over to dry ground and stood them on their end so all the girls and could pick the bits and pieces they wanted. I could see the Moms with calves snuggled together, some were sleeping but some Moms disturbed by all the noise I was making were now getting up and stretching then walking over to either the outer or inner part of the bale whichever they preferred much like an Oreo cookie (I like the center). I then noticed poor orphan Sally all alone under a cedar tree curled up in the bedding, she was sleeping.

I drove over and parked the tractor between her and Thor the bull as a precaution, he is not aggressive but with any bull you should never take a chance if you are to be fussing with calves, just in case. Even though most days Thor loves watching the girls and I play hat parade he respects my boundary and I do the same of his. I hopped to the ground and wandered over to Sally hoping she was not going to take that bottle, meaning she had eaten earlier from her Mom. I pulled the sweet smelling bottle of milk from my vest and placed it to her nose, she stood up latched on sucking it dry; I had my answer. I noticed a strange red Hereford cow standing in the distance watching us. I patted Sally and told her everything was going to be alright and left her standing there. It was still spitting rain. I threw the empty bottle in the tractor and walked around counting the cows and calves. I felt sorry for Sally but was still hopeful it would all work out. I watched as she wandered among the Moms and let out a couple of bawling sounds, telling her Mom she was looking.


I then as usual proceeded to walk the bush and that is when I seen Sally's (the orphan calf) Mom with older cow Sandy and they were both following one very energetic running calf, I now figured out that they had both probably had their calves born at the same time, hence the confusion. There were two Moms one calf, one calf (Sally) no Mom. There was nothing that I could do about that and with the cow count right and calf cow right and Sally fed there was nothing else I could do back here. I knew I would come back to feed Sally and check for more calves again at noon. I headed back to the basement of disappointment and possible broken dreams and thoughts of a lot of work. It was now half an hour till I could get to that creative writing class and register.

Walking through that basement door and hearing the pump running, then looking at the enormous amount of work waiting to be done I sighed. Thinking but still wavering a bit I decided to run up those stairs wash that sticky milk off my hands, I slapped on some nice smelling cream to cover the smell of the sweet milk that may have spilled and threw on some clean clothes, grabbed that pad of paper and two new pens sitting on the table then raced out the door. I knew if I once again let this interfere with my plans I would never go. The farm and life’s difficulties would continue to always be first and I needed at this time in my life to move these problems to second place, I needed to do this, it was my time. I am not getting any younger and I have to think about myself, selfish maybe, but I needed this. I needed to prove to myself that I was more than just the farmer. Off I drove down the road.

I arrived at that class smelling like sweet milk I am sure, but hopefully no one noticed. I sat in a small class with like-minded eager to learn students and a skilled published writing teacher whom I really liked. I used my new pen and pad of pad of paper and learned how to get ideas flowing for a story. My mind once in a while wandered back to the farm and worried a bit about what was going on but knowing it would still be there waiting for me when I finished this class that I have been thinking of taking for many years and have never made the time.

I walked out the door of that class smiling, excited at the thought of making new friends and learning things I did not know about what I love to do. I had homework tucked under my arm and a new outlook.



I know you are probably still wondering about poor orphan Sally well I am going to tell you. After feeding her all that day and then My Hero doing the night feeding I headed out early the next morning with yet another warm bottle of milk tucked in my vest. I fed the cows and walked all around looking for her but she was nowhere to be found, I have to say I was a little worried about that always watching me Coyote and afraid the Coy wolves that I had seen not too long ago and I thought that was the end of her. I headed back to the bush and there she was standing under a tree.
She was standing there nursing on a Red Hereford cow with her tail wagging and the Red cow was licking her.

I know this is when you are thinking that her Mom had found her. It was not her Mother because I had seen her following Sandy’s calf which by the way really seems to enjoy having two Moms. “All is well that ends well” but …….

You know there is more to this story don’t you? Did I mention her new Mom was going to have a calf very soon?


Later

40 comments:

  1. Due to a lot of 'hustle and bustle' I haven't been on your blog for a long time. Sorry for that! Finally I found some time now and I've watched your posts and I read it with a lot of pleasure.
    Thank you very much for being a loyal follower of my blog :-)

    Hope you'll have a great week
    http://dzjiedzjee.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a full and wonderfully busy day! Hope the calves all get taken care of by their real moms!!!...:)JP

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hmmm So the new mom has a nursing calf and another on the way. This sounds interesting!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Buttons, I think you write beautifully already. I enjoy your blog posts tremendously! You make a hard days work sound so interesting and "fulfilling", lol.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Can't wait for your next blog entry!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Buttons, tucking that milk into your vest serves two masters...keeps it warm and you warm..I used to love tucking the lamb's bottle into my jacket...the smell is wonderful.
    Oh my gosh...Sally is nursing an expectant cow? Lordy, that's going to not sit right when the new calf arrives. You're in for it now!
    You're not being selfish; you're being wise. when I took care of my MIL, it didn't take too -grin- long to figure out if I didn't take care of me first, I'd crash and burn. It's something I still need to work on; since Dave died, it's all on me and me is wearing out and down quickly. I was 61 on Friday and on Thursday we sheared 22 sheep. On Fri I had to drive 5 hours, RT, to retrieve my truck which had a recall. I took it easy this weekend but my body is still in recovery and I'm too close to tears. "Fatigue makes cowards of us all" so said Vince Lombardy. Right now, I'm a yellow bellied coward.

    ReplyDelete
  7. love that last picture!
    The joys of babies :) they keep you on your toes!
    Have fun with your writing class :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. I'm glad Sally found a surrogate Mom. And have fun at class!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I'm so glad you got to your course. Poor little Sally...I wonder if the substitute mother will continue to look after her

    ReplyDelete
  10. poor sweet calf - about to get orphaned again.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Land sakes Girlie, this is like a "Perils Of Pauline" story! :-)

    But so glad you got yourself to your class!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I'm happy for you...that you got to your class! I'm sad for dear little, cute little Sally...I know she'll be taken care of one way or another, but wishing her mom could figure it all out!!

    ReplyDelete
  13. How nice that she has someone to take care of her. Also how nice that you are taking that class. I bet you are going to have so much fun. Not to mention making friends.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I knew it ~ optimism won this time !
    One of my fav saying is "Alls well that ends well" I think my friends now roll their eyes at me as I say it so often .
    Looks like a new adventure in store with this mommy soon to have her own babe . I can hardly wait to hear the outcome , thinking good thoughts I am.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Glad that Sally has found an adoptive mother. Glad also that you are taking the time to do something for yourself that you have wanted to do for so long. Sorry about the flooded basement. I had that happen 2 years ago and it's not fun.
    Have a wonderful week.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Sally has won our hearts! I love your writing, just as it is.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I'm so glad you got to class B! Maybe Sally's adoptive mom will think she's had twins?

    ReplyDelete
  18. I am so glad you made that class. I firmly believe that some day all this will be published as a wonderful record of farm life. You are so dedicated to your cows, you write so well, and you for sure know how to leave one in suspense. I hope all works out for little Sally.

    ReplyDelete
  19. So happy you got to your class. I know I must wait for the next installation and must cool my heels but I am wondering what will happen to Sally when surrogate Mom has her baby, oh my oh my!

    ReplyDelete
  20. I told you it would all work out! Now the new twist? I have no idea what might happen.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Oh my! Can't wait for the next chapter!!!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Of course you should take that writing class. Life is short, you work hard, and the farm continues whether you are there, fretting, or not. It is good to be good to yourself, Buttons.

    ReplyDelete
  23. You have had quite a busy day! You really should take the writing class. xoxo

    ReplyDelete
  24. This reminded me of Are You My Mother? which I read endlessly to my children (and now Grandchildren). You are one busy lady!

    ReplyDelete
  25. B,

    The writing class is something you've wanted to do for sometime. I'm glad you went to the class. Life will always keeps us busy with our families, animals, home, and the farm. You should always take care of yourself first, the other work will follow :-)

    Besides, your Hero will be smiling knowing you took the class.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Yay - am so glad you went to your writing class. No, it's not selfish and I'm sure your Hero would say the same. It's something you've been wanting to do.
    All worked out so well too with Sally finding a Mum... I'm thinking that the hereford will have bonded with Sally by now. All those licks while she has been feeding... surely. Hope all turns out well.
    Enjoy your writing class homework B. Cheerio :D)

    ReplyDelete
  27. So glad that everything seem to turn out.. So happy that you made it to your class. But I am thinking you could teach them a thing or two. Your writing is awesome my friend.

    Hoping your week goes well.

    Hugs~

    ReplyDelete
  28. It will be interesting when the mom has the calf and nursing the two of them. Glad to see you made it the creative writing class. Hope you share what you learn along the way. Love all your images.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Oh good lord. Its the continuing saga of "the valley of the baby doll calves"... ;)

    And you will always be more then a farmer to me!!!

    Its 2 am and I was taking pictures of the moon tonight, not buying underwear...late am tomorrow sleep in AGAIN LOL

    and you reminded me of a moment long ago - your thought of whether someone smelled dairy on you at your writing class - I remember talking to Cindy, the girls 2nd grade teacher, outside in the cloakroom ( I did a pta stint for awhile). She was sitting on low shoe shelf, hung up above her was a young boys barn coat...she leaned over to the coat inhaling deeply, then smiled and turned her face up to me to say "oh, steven must have been helping his dad with the morning milking today, I can smell the cows"...knowing cindy was raised on a dairy farm, it was wonderful to see her face range with all her childhood emotions...Buttons, you may very well find someone leaning in to smell you too one day with a blissful face...

    and thats not a bad thing, my friend.
    xoxo

    ReplyDelete
  30. Seems as if all is going to turn out well. Hugs M xx

    ReplyDelete
  31. you posess the best qualities of a farmer and a writer...

    i know this story will have a joyfull ending....

    love the image of the nursing calf...and if i followed the story correctly, that's sally!!

    ReplyDelete
  32. I love that image of Sally hiding in the hay!!! I do hop that cow has the patience to nurse both calves...

    ReplyDelete
  33. I love the way you already write, Buttons, but I know you will enjoy the new class. I sure hope the new mama-to-be will still be Sally's surrogate mom! Can't wait to read more!

    ReplyDelete
  34. There is a saying (used in the movie, "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel"): "Things will work out in the end, and if they haven't worked out, it is not yet the end."
    It looks like things are working out for Sally and her new "Mom." It will be interesting to see what happens when the new Mom has her own calf.
    As Jian Ghomeshi ends his show, "to be continued."
    I'm loving reading these stories!

    ReplyDelete
  35. Hi Buttons!
    I am catching up on your wonderful stories! This one is my favorite!
    We have had our share of orphaned calves. Sometimes another mother will take them or we have to bottle feed them. But it is such an rewarding challenge!

    Take care!
    xo
    Cindy

    ReplyDelete
  36. That is so awesome for Sally! Herefords have the most amazing maternal instincts. But now what when mama calves? I like when splices work like this.
    I have a bottle baby. Her mama I think froze her bag, lost a teat and wasn't feeding baby. Baby is thin but gaining. I call her beanstalk! LOL! She is at the house here with an injured horse named Jack. Jack and the beanstalk! :)

    ReplyDelete
  37. Sally is so lucky to have you! Is it possible that the new cow could keep her and the new calf? You can see that I don't know much about this, but I do love learning from you.

    So glad you made it to class! I hope you will have a great adventure there!

    ReplyDelete
  38. yay sally! you can't make this stuff up!

    ReplyDelete
  39. yay sally! you can't make this stuff up!

    ReplyDelete
  40. Sally's so cute covered in the hay. It's good to see she's adopted a mother, or is it the other way around? I'm so glad you went to the writing class!

    ReplyDelete

The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

Please do not copy my work. If you like it let me know I am sure we can work something out. Copyright is in place.