Monday, March 2, 2015

Lucky Lucy (Part 2)

As defect of strength in all of us makes some weights to be immovable,
so likewise,
defect of understanding makes some truths to be mysterious.
               Thomas Sherlock



If you remember, Lucy was last seen lying in a cardboard box in our basement with My Hero soothing her, trying to get her warm and keep her alive. Well this being real life we had some decisions to make. My Hero had to get back to work, the reality was, we had done all we could and the rest would be left to fate. My Hero left Lucky Lucy in my capable hands, both of us knowing that ultimately what will happen will happen.

I left Lucky Lucy in the basement sleeping, her breath was shallow but the sun streaming through the window was keeping her warm. I rushed upstairs to grab a bit of portable breakfast, meaning a banana and then headed back to feed the cows and do some more checking. The tractor had been running, trying to warm up all the time we were dealing with Lucky Lucy. I headed back to see if Lucy’s mom was OK. Oh yes, I did know who she was and I had to know what happened, and why she had abandoned her calf. I knew that she being one of our older more experienced moms, that there had to be a good reason.


Sure enough, it did not take me long to figure it out. There was Sandy with another calf. I know you are thinking she must have had twins but that was not the case. Motherly instinct kicks in after the calf is born and while she is cleaning it up. If you remember Lucy was clean so that bonding had happened. It appears that a little calf being a few days old, must have walked over to check out the new birth with her own mom and that is when Sandy had gotten confused. Long story short; we now have one calf with two moms and now, poor Lucy has none.  Since it was -27 degrees Celsius with the wind-chill, there was nothing we could do. Most times we would have brought the calf back to her mom and she would have figured it out, but we would not take that chance. Lucy would now stay with us and one lucky calf would get lots of attention from two moms.

All was well back in the bush. The cows were happy munching on hay. There was Sandy happy following another mom and its calf. I headed back to the house to make some phone calls. Lucy was still lying in the sun breathing easier. I rolled her over so she would dry, she was nice and warm. I arranged with our vet to pick up a shot to prevent pneumonia. Since I had a dentist appointment, I knew I had to put Lucy in a more secure spot just in case, while I was gone she did get up. Lucy was warm and dry now and seemed to be doing better. I rolled Lucy onto a carpet and dragged her over to the other side of the basement away from all the heat which would not be good for her. I made a bed and put a barrier up, hoping she would be up when I returned. I hope you understand that we could not keep her in the basement so she would eventually have to go back outside; I could not have her getting used to the heat of the woodstove.

I headed to my appointment, where the whole time the nice dental hygienist was cleaning my teeth, I was worrying about Lucy. I was secretly hoping Lucky Lucy would make it, and be up and walking around my basement when I returned. I visited the vet on the way home who gave me some advice and the medicine I needed. I also stopped to see if a dairy farmer up the road had any fresh colostrum (first milk) to feed her. I had bought powdered colostrum from the vet, but fresh milk always being a better bet I knew I had to try. Mr. P did have some and I rushed home not knowing what lie ahead.


As soon as I turned the key to my door and opened it while rushing down the stairs I listened to the sound of a bawling calf echoing through the house. I have to tell you, I could have easily named her Bellowing Bertha with that kind of noise. It was an incredible sound to hear indeed. I walked up to see a completely dry, toasty warm and I like to think smiling face looking up from behind a temporary boxed barrier. “Hi Lucky Lucy, welcome to my world.”  She smiled and I am pretty sure it wasn’t just “gas”J

My Hero came home to a very different scene than he had left earlier that morning. I had given Lucy the shot and given her the fresh colostrum so by then she was walking around our basement, alive and happy with no signs of damage to her ears or tail. We went to work making a bed in the barn for Lucy. My Hero and I now take turns feeding her three times a day and she walks around like she “Owns the joint” as the old movies used to say.

Lucky Lucy will continue to be a bottle fed calf, just like her cousin Annie. She will join her herd (family) when our weather changes, which will hopefully be soon. I do hope that she will be more grateful then that Annie who has continued to ignore me ever since that, weaning off the bottle thing long ago.


My Hero and I will continue on with the calving season. We are just in the early stages and now have four healthy and happy calves. We will always be hoping that all will go well and the weather will warm up. Truly never really knowing what lies ahead. We do know that we will always do everything we possibly can as a team, and that will have to be good enough.

Later
HomeAcre Hop


48 comments:

  1. Lucy was Lucky indeed! After a rough start, it looks as though she is thriving. I hope the rest of your calving goes well! We are down to 3 more heifers to calve and we have more than half of the cow's babies born. So we are making progress - slowly, but surely.

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  2. So glad that Lucy has made it. You and your hero have excellent parenting skills!!!!! She is adorable.

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  3. Yay! Glad to read of a good outcome and a happy ending!

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  4. Fabulous news on Lucky Lucy.

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  5. I love the happy ending of Lucky Lucy's story. When I was reading that you came home to a bawling calf, I imagined the worst because...

    I once lost a calf that was born outside the gate as the mother laid too close to the gate. He suffered hypothermia and as he was slowly warming up he bawled loudly and I was so glad, I thought that he was going to make it. He died... I had worked on him for almost 4 hours.
    I have a calf that made it but frost bitten ears. Later the tip of her ears turned black, dried off and fell. Her ears are shorter than all the other and she has had many calves since then. I called her Frostbite.

    I rejoice with you Button. A job well done.
    Spring is on the way.
    Hugs,
    JB

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  6. a happy ending!!!!!!

    all the work, has been worth it.

    hugs,
    Tessa~

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  7. Happy ending and a new beginning! Thanks so much for sharing Lucky Lucy's story Buttons!

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  8. Oh I am soo pleased all went well . I can imagine the thrill of hearing her bellow from the basement ! Lovely story and photos . My heart is singing for this calf . Thanks for sharing , Have a good day !

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  9. Oh I'm so happy it turned out - good - only another "herdsperson..woman.." would understand. Good luck Lucky Lucy!

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  10. Good job! Bottle fed calves are so cute...then they head butt you and get obnoxious for their bottle:)

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  11. well, i'm glad both her mom and lucy made it! and i hope she'll be able to rejoin the herd soon.

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  12. She's a pretty little thing. How funny to hear a calf bawling from inside your home.

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  13. Thanks for sharing Lucy's story with us. As a city girl who lives out in the country without farm animals, I can live vicariously through your experiences. Linda@Wetcreek Blog

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  14. Lucky to have you to care for her! She's a cutey. Hope it gets warmer soon and this is the only hitch in your calving season.

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  15. Adorable! And you forgot to tell everyone how slimy feeding her is!!! LOL Do they make little nose bibs for calves?

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  16. Lucy is adorable. I have never heard of a cow doing that with another's calf. Lucy is also lucky in that she doesn't have to go out in the cold. So glad you saved her - LOL the portable breakfast!
    Lynne x

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  17. What a truly lovely story. Lucky Lucy indeed. Thank you to you - and to your Hero.

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  18. Yay! I am so glad it's a happy ending. A very nice looking little calf, I might add... :)

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  19. now is that not interesting calf story ever!! i have never heard a story like that. i would just assume a mom would know her calf no matter what. neat-o!! thanks for sharing!! ( :

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  20. A beautiful story with a happy ending! You might just have to put a hat on Lucy for a photo shoot!

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  21. B,

    I'm happy to hear Lucky Lucy made it, and is up and moving.
    She is adorable, and I hope she adjusts well to her new bed out in the barn.
    Hugs to you and your Hero.
    Sandy

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  22. It's definitely a tough time of year for those newborns. I'm so glad to hear she's doing ok! That bawling sound is music to the ears, when you're not sure how healthy a calf is going to be!!

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  23. I'm so happy to know Lucy and her mama are okay. Great job, B!

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  24. Oh! I love, love, love this story, Buttons! Hopefully Lucky Lucy will be more appreciative than Annie.:-) I know life on a farm is never an easy go, and I send along my best wishes for success for Lucky Lucy as well as all the other calves. xo Nellie

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  25. I always wondered how much switching goes on in the cows. Heifers I witness that first hand! But older cows? I always hope when a cow looses a calf, she finds a cow with twins and adopts one! :) motherly instinct is strong.
    So, so glad Lucy made it. They are so precious.
    Gosh, I hope your weather warms up and Lucy can run and play with the other kids instead of tearing up the basement!
    Cheri

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  26. They are such fun and I have to admit more than bossy! My Father and I had a cow die from uterine rupture, a very large calf became our "Baby" She was called Thunderfoot as she would hear us move around in the morning or at lunch or whenever and then she would stampede to the porch and thunder inside it! Demanding bellows would follow and then breakfast would be served as fast as possible! Good Luck with the rest of your calving and I do hope your weather gets better!

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  27. You're a fantastic team to find Lucky Lucy early and then know exactly what to do to save her. I hope the rest of the calving season goes well.

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  28. A happy ending!!. Lucy has adorable markings.

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  29. Well, you answered my question about the Mom. Lucky Lucy is indeed lucky. Hope your weather warms soon.

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  30. I have to agree that Lucy is one Lucky gal. I was hoping it would end this way..

    Hugs~

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  31. Oh, I am so relieved and delighted that Lucky Lucy has such wonderful 'parents' to look after her.
    From stories mum has told me I know how difficult farming life can be and, although you have much more modern machinery and means of communication, a farmer's life is such a busy one with trauma always waiting just around the corner.
    I do hope Lucy will remember you as her benefactors and not ignore you as Annie now does.
    I was quite amazed to learn of the confusion of the two cow mums with poor Lucy being left on the outer with her own mum. Lucky little calf who now has the benefit of two mothers.
    Well done to you and your Hero in what, to you, is just an everyday event in farming life but, to we city dwellers, sounds so daunting.

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  32. Lovely ending, and so pleased all is going well. Hugs M xox

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  33. Wow Buttons! What a story. Lucy is one lucky calf indeed.

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  34. I wonder if that bawling was music to your ears...you had me completely wrapped up in the story..and I am so glad that there was a happy ending.

    Jen

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  35. such Wonderful news about Lucy...very well done, Grace!

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  36. Lucky lucy, what a wonderful story and so well written!!

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  37. I love a happy ending :) this made me smile.

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  38. My goodness, Buttons, you do have your hands full! So glad it all ended happily for you and for Lucky Lucy! She's a sweetie and so are you! xo Karen

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  39. You are a fabulous farmer. bringing back to life Lucky Lucy.

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  40. That's a wonderful end to Lucky Lucy's story B. Good on you both. Lucy is incredibly luck :D)

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  41. She is adorable!!
    glad she made it!!

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  42. Ahhhhh --- I'm so happy she's doing better!

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  43. New to your blog . I love cows so much so that I refuse to eat them. I see cows out in pastures now covered in snow and I wonder how well they cope in cold temperatures. I love seeing happy cows while driving along the rural farm roads. I am sure if I passed by your farm...I would see happy cows! Your story of Lucky was heart warming to hear. I will come back!

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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