Thursday, July 16, 2015

Between the drops....

Adversity has the effect of eliciting talents
which in prosperous circumstances would have laid dormant.
                    Horace


I grab my sweater, as I come through the door from being outside this early morning. I wanted to take a few morning photos. Well, I must say that those three days with the heat and humidity did not last as long as I had wished they had.

Those dark clouds blanketing the sky were obviously hiding just long enough for us to get a tease of what haying weather really should be. I should not complain; haying weather did last four days here on our farm. Oh yes we had to hustle. We have finally gotten round bales sitting in some fields. I was so excited thinking we could finally get back to business. As per usual, after a long day of baling and then backing the baler inside the drive shed I jumped out of the tractor to check the bale counter.


7…..”What the heck”? I had baled for six hours and it only tells me 7 bales. Drat. The counter must have gotten stuck. I cannot explain my disappointment in seeing that number. This means that after all the baling My Hero and I have been doing, we will have to go out and count the bales in the field ourselves. “Bale counter you are fired” I screamed at it. Usually I would not be as upset but like many farmers, and no matter where you live this summer it has been disappointing to say the least, as far as harvesting goes. Frustration and exhaustion make you, dare I say a bit grumpy sometimes.


I have many farmer friends out there in Bloggerland. This farming thing seems to be the same everywhere this year. My friend Jent was shouting at Mother Nature because their farm fields were flooded and they could not get their crop off. Another friend was commenting that there will be no hay because of drought. Mother Nature you are full of trickery this year. Those forest fires out west could really use that rain, if you are finished teasing us farmers, please go help them.

Sitting here at this moment the sun is coming up. Oh yes the sun is coming up, but the dark clouds still blanket the sky, it is very cool out, strange weather indeed. No doubt about it, this is obviously another tease by Mother Nature. We will get the machinery all ready to go again. We will check the weather every half hour and then decide to take a chance and go cut some more hay. Then bam the skies will open and “rain on our parade” as my Grandma used to say.


Oh yes we have indeed fallen for those teases a few times. We seem to always forget, that if we cut the hay and it is almost dry lying in the fields that those dark clouds will for sure open up and drench the hay. If it has already been raked, all fluffy and dry…. that is almost a given that it will rain.

Well I guess I should go get dressed. Warm clothes to start, but that may change as the day goes on. I will be heading out to go and count those bales in the fields, that we actually did get cut and baled without any rain. There is still a lot more to get off, that was only the beginning.


So as of this very moment the bale count 7. Darn you bale counter. I will have a better number next week to share. Good luck to all my fellow farmers out there who are all probably constantly guessing and hoping. "Stay Calm and remember it will work out." OK.
Join us click here. Thanks Theresa.




Later

44 comments:

  1. Good luck.
    I hope Mother Nature plays nicely. And the bale counter too.

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  2. Good morning, I wish you and all the farmers good luck! It is hard work and depends so much on Mother Nature. I love the last shot of the field, bales of hay and trees. Great fence post, enjoy your day!

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  3. Farming is such a difficult job. I don't think people realize just how difficult and then they have to rely on the weather so much. My hats off to all you farmers. Without you we would starve!!

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  4. Good Morning, Wonderful fence post. Blessings and Good wishes for the hard work you do farming. So sorry about the bale counter. I hope the weather cooperates with you to the finish. Your photos are always beautiful. Have a good day. cm

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  5. Up and ready to take pictures says your optimism remains in the face of adversity. Good for you!

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  6. Farming is a thankless occupation most of the time it seems, I know our farmer neighbours seem to be working from early morn until way past my bedtime!
    I hope you counted hundreds of bales and that they are all safe and dry now.

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  7. I'm sorry Buttons...all that frustration and the the bale counter sticks on top of it all! This weather. Frustrations all around this year. Hope your day goes well, and the SUN SHINES for a WEEK!

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  8. oh, that stinks! i'd have fired it too after such a paltry performance. :) now, mother nature, we can't do anything about. here, we had so much rain for a prolonged spring that the first crop of hay was basically a waste as no one could cut and it aged in the wet pastures. always something... hope you can get yours in. love your views!

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  9. We have had wacky weather here on our rather tiny island as well. One day it's hot as blazes and muggy to boot and then the very next day it's cool and windy. Of course, this isn't so unusual for New England but it does seem to be a bit crazier this year....and don't even get me started about last winter....the big snow pile officially finished melting on July 14. No, that isn't a typo! I hope all works out for you....and that you get the darn bale counter working again.

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  10. Oh Buttons, I so know what you're going through. Actually last year was wet for us but we are having better luck this year. But we still have to dodge the rain drops. What some people don't know is if you bale wet hay, the bale will heat up and spoil and there's even the danger of spontaneous combustion. Two years ago we had a bale catch on fire in the field and it took for ever to put it out. Another thing is that to get the best hay it has to be cut at a certain stage when the hay nutrition is at it's peak, after that the quality declines and poor hay means lower milk production for us dairy farmers.

    We can bale hay that is still too wet for haylage but we can wrap it like big marshmallow for silage to prevent the air to get at it and good silage = good milk production.

    Haying is like playing Russian Roulette with a loaded gun sometimes.

    I hope the weather gets just right for haying. Good luck with this .
    Hugs,
    JB

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  11. What gorgeous scenes today!! LOVE the morning light on the side of the barn especially today. The weather is always something when it comes to ANY kind of farming. Hope it'll cooperate for you.

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  12. Too much rain can be diasterous as well as too little. Your views are great. hoep the sun shinnes soon for you.

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  13. Living here in the eastern part of Texas we were drenched in May and June and our hay fields lay wet for weeks on end. Our first cut was two months later than usual but it was a bounty. Had we had to wait much longer it would have had to be turned over. Yes, there's no predicting Mother Nature.

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  14. I have had my farming days. However, never had machinery to worry about. Just hard work by man.

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  15. Hay making is a lot more stressful than I ever anticipated!! I was just celebrating that we may have a week of dry weather next week. Keeping my fingers crossed. I hope all goes well there!!

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  16. Hi Buttons - Frustrating conditions for sure for farmers. I'll be in "your neck of the woods" next week and keep changing gears on what clothes I should pack. I haven't worn long pants or long sleeves in months, but maybe I'd better throw in a couple warmer things just in case! Looking forward to seeing you soon and good luck with the haying.

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  17. B,

    Mother nature has away of teasing us when were trying to get work done outside on the homestead or farm. I hope all works out for you, and you and your Hero get the number count you were counting on!
    Hugs,
    Sandy

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  18. Oh, that is frustrating! Mother Nature is playing tricks this year. We haven't had rain in so long, my well is running low and we have to ration the water. Fires are breaking out everywhere. I hope your hay stays nice and dry and your bale counting goes quickly. We appreciate all our overworked and underpaid farmers. Bless your hearts. xo Karen

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  19. I keep going back to grabbing your sweater as you go out the door. With the heat around 100 degrees this week and for the foreseeable future, I am jealous of you having to wear a sweater. But I'm not jealous of your errant bale counter. It's always something. We got one tractor back from the shop and sent another back on the truck. When they bring that one back, they'll either pick up another tractor or the combine. Ugh!

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  20. I loved my visit with you on the farm today no matter the weather and id enjoy going out to count the bales too! It brings back sweet childhood memories of haymaking times! I loved it and its funny how I always remember that the weather was glorious!
    Hope you do get through the harvest with much blessing!

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  21. Gorgeous views with those dramatic clouds. Love the shots of the barn and fencing. Wonderful photography today! Hope you get all your hay baled before rain comes again. Must be frustrating about the counter.

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  22. Interesting post and neat pictures. I take it you are in Canada somewhere?

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  23. It's true. If there's hay curing in the field it's gonna rain. Sigh.

    That pesky bale counter!

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  24. What pretty farm fences and scenes. I love hay that's rolled up like that, it always looks so cool.

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  25. I sure hope your weather cooperates soon! Now I know where the saying "Make hay while the sun shines" comes from - a farmer must have thought of it! We're getting afternoon storms here in the mountains of CO which isn't unusual. Rather that than dry and forest fires.

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  26. You are so right about Mother Nature. She is all out of sorts!

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  27. Farming is a way of life. You have to like what you do. You have to accept what mother nature throws at you.

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  28. Can't wait to hear what the real count is.

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  29. And, some lazy ones like me, that live in the city complain about cutting grass :)

    Glad you got it all done!

    Loved the photos from the tractor and the fences.

    Have a Wonderful Day!
    Peace :)

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  30. I do hope our weather dries out for a bit! Rain, rain, go away!

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  31. While we are directly "farming", we are affected too by how much hay and grain our neighbors are putting up. What a crazy year :-/. Hang in there!

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  32. Very beautiful photos! What a hard job! Hugs, Diane

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  33. Oh my, the bale counter failed.....so you must have heaps of baling to do to get ready for the winter. Hugs M xox

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  34. Grace, I totally understand your frustration over the weather...and when we drive by our stunted, golden fried fields our hearts ache for the farmers also. Here we are at the opposite end of your weather. It's scary, and worrisome....they tell us that wheat is going sky high because of the drought. So wet, or dry, it's all bad on the news...

    What a drag about the bale counter, I'm sorry the silly thing choose that moment to give up the ghost...how frustrating.

    And sending you wishes for better weather...maybe you could send us some rain?

    Jen

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  35. mother nature, so unpredictable....our weather has been good. just the right amount of rain and sunshine!!! waiting on that final count!!!

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  36. Mother Nature has been kind to our hay. Trouble is, no one wants it. Since we have no need, we offered it to others to cut and bale. No takers. I'm thinking they may regret that late this year.

    Soon we will begin to bush hog to mulch the grass and scatter the seed to feed the wildlife and enrich the ground. Right now we have turkey nests and baby deer so we are letting them hide in the tall hay for a few more weeks.

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  37. Good luck with your hay! Rain is like that....
    ~

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  38. Good luck with everything! The weather is so fickle. I hope it turns around for the better. Send that rain to California - we need it! xoxo

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  39. Drats that does stink! I wish for you and your Hero warm sunny days and 0 rain.
    Have a good weekend!

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  40. We would love some of your rain, so please send it this way !

    Really though, weather is always a reminder we mere mortals only THINK we're in control of our lives and destiny. We can't control the weather, and we can't even depend on the weather forecast. We can depend on God and also know as you said. " Stay calm and remember it will work out O.K. "

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  41. The weather has been crazy in most parts of the world this year. One can't deny climate change. We have had a cyclone in winter???? and now the coldest winter for decades.(which is a little reassuring in that it has happened before. We have migratory birds that have stayed here instead of flying back to Russia. I feel for you farmers with unpredictable weather patterns. We have many farm areas in desperate need of rain.Love your photos.

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  42. It is always something...and seems like with farming, it is not just if you are a steady worker and making good decisions...so much depends on what the weather throws at you.

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  43. Love that last shot. Yes indeed Mother Nature is a tricky old woman. We haven't had any measurable rain for almost 3 months. Scary for us wetlanders.
    MB

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