Wednesday, September 16, 2015

A Hardy Bunch...

Responsibility is the thing people dread most of all.
Yet it is the one thing in the world that develops us,
gives us manhood or womanhood fiber.
                                   Frank Crane


It’s raining. Not one of those soft gentle rains, but one of those “Raining cats and dogs” kind my Grandma always talked about.

I sit here in our old farm truck listening to the rain pound on the roof while watching farmers dressed in coveralls with rain gear over top. Carrying umbrellas of every description, they juggle everything from boxes of nuts and bolts, to armfuls of shovels and picks. They are soaking wet but pushing on. I wave to the young man without rain gear as he walks by and smiles as I sit here nice and dry, writing. He drops his boxes in the back of his old pickup sitting beside ours. A young woman not wearing rain gear, with a young child in tow who is wearing tiny red rubber boots and a yellow slicker, carry things that no doubt the farmer in their lives just had to bid on, thinking they were needed.

Auctions need to happen rain or shine, that is just the way it is. Any farmer will tell you that. It is part of the business of either someone retiring, or settling an estate for a farm family. We all hope for perfect weather but sometimes it just does not happen.


Farmers, young and old, huddle inside farm buildings where machinery and cattle used to run. Huddled, and listening to the auctioneer’s voice that bounces and echoes off the empty walls. The auctioneer shouts out numbers and sometimes silly banter to entertain, to capture and to hold the attention of those standing round trying to support this family. The crowd will laugh, ultimately lightening the mood. The words SOLD Sold Sold penetrate the steel walls of the building entering the ears of a farm girl sitting in her farm truck writing, trying to get up the courage to venture out into the pounding rain.


An older gentleman dressed only in an orange hunting cap and a flannel shirt and jeans walked by his arms full of rolls of black and white electrical wire. He is soaking wet. This does not stop him from depositing it in the back of his pick-up and once again heading across the barnyard and into the building to rejoin the other auction goers.

Those auction goers who huddle inside the building full of wet people, a building where cattle and equipment used to run. A building that is now so full others stand huddled outside under umbrellas in the pounding rain while supporting this farm family.

Farmers are a hardy bunch, trying to support one of their own, no matter what Mother Nature has in mind. I grab my umbrella and finally get up the courage to venture into the storm, knowing this is what we do. The rain is now pounding on my umbrella as I walk. I join the crowd huddled outside under their umbrellas of every description, outside that building where livestock and farm machinery used to run.


I am proud to be a farmer today. Take that Mother Nature.


Later

29 comments:

  1. Hello, what a great post. It is great that the farmers support each with these kinds of auctions. The farmers are a hardy bunch, showing up in the pouring down rain to take a chance on winning an auction bid. I hope you and your hubby found something good. Have a great day and week ahead!

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  2. I love when you go to auction. You give us such a great picture with emotions included.

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  3. Good morning Buttons. I really enjoyed your previous post and this one too.

    I'm sitting here on a beautiful sunny morning in Ottawa at my daughter Christine table catching up on blogs I was too busy to read and comment on last week. It's strange not getting up before the sun to feed and bed 33 calves twice a day and pick and weed cucumbers for hours every couple of days.

    I slept in this morning and persuade myself to linger a bit longer. I could get used to not having to get up before the sun. I had time to meditate and empty my mind and feel my body relax for once. A feeling of peace and wellness came over me. I'm going on a leisure walk to see what I can see just because there's time to spare.

    I hope that you will continue to write as it's such a beautiful gift.
    Hugs,
    JB

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  4. Farmers really are a hardy bunch... I grew up in a city... I love the rain but I don't stand out in it...

    Thank you so much for dropping by my blog lettersfromlaunna.blogspot.com ... I appreciate the kind and sweet comment... have a great week xox

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  5. Just beautiful.
    And a big thank you to farmers. The world over.

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  6. I got lost in this post. Although I don't know what it's like to be a farmer, I respect it. I understand what it means to walk a certain path and to have a sense of camaraderie with those who walk the same one. Not only are you a farmer, you also are a writer (among other things) and through your words, I feel a sense of togetherness with you. xoxo

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    1. Thank you Shaharoh hearing that my writing touches someone like you who is an talented amazing singer and artist means a lot to me, It is always nice to hear. I love your music.

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  7. The skies were crying for this family. Your story is wonderful - I nearly got wet as I read it!

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  8. Lovely post, Buttons. You wrote as though you painted the picture in my mind. Your writing is wonderful and love all your images!

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  9. Farm folks are just more resilient than us city slickers.

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  10. Hardy for sure Buttons! I don't think that hardiness goes away when you move away from the farm either. I love your blogs ... they always take me right back to the farm. You always take the best pictures too. I think a hockey stick even crept into one of them. So Canadian! By the way, if it's not too much trouble could you please send some of that rain to California.

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  11. I remember my dad's farm sale when he retired. It was a bright, sunny day but unfortunately, I was sick as a dog and watched what I could from inside my car. It was not a good day because I was not only sick but so sad that my parent's sold the farm. I loved that place so much. But, there was a good turnout and things sold good, though. It's wonderful how neighbors in farm communities support each other. Great post, B!

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  12. You give it to her, Girl! You are all so tough and hardy. Well done farmers of the world and especially you and your hero.

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  13. Every time I come here, you remind me of growing up on the farm and the essential goodness of people. *hugs*

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  14. Firstly I must apologise for not visiting you more often but Phil and I've had an awful head/cheat cold that took its toll of both of us. After 5 weeks we, today, are actually beginning to feel human again.
    I love this post of yours describing how farmers can't resist an auction in spite or the prevailing weather. I wonder if you yourself found any items you wanted to bi on and, if bid you did, did you perhaps win that item?
    When I read your posts it often goes through my head that I wished we had not had to leave the farm down south because of my mother's ill health. I often dream of how it would have been had I remained a farmer's daughter.
    Once again, thank for sharing such a delightful day in your life. x

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  15. Thank you, Buttons, for making it so clear to me how important auctions are to farmers.

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  16. it's hard work, thank you for doing it!!! you sure do deserve that "feather in your cap"!!!!!!!

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  17. B,

    I love farmers especially those who help one another out!!!
    Did your Hero find anything at the auction?
    It doesn't matter what type of weather, the auction rolls on....
    Hugs,
    Sandy

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  18. Farmers are such good people - always helpful and supportive of one another. The salt of the earth. Bless them all. xo Karen

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  19. Our best friends here in Bluff Country are mostly farmers. Hardworking upstanding people. The best kind......:)

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  20. We would take a little of that rain. Would you like to share with Kansas? We could always use a little boost as we prepare to plant the 2016 wheat crop.

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  21. Good to get that rain. Many would love to have it down this end of the world.
    Yesterday another auction....

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  22. I guess you really have to want to be there to stick through that weather.

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  23. People who work outside learned a long time ago they don't melt or shrink. As long as we can keep dry under some rain gear or an umbrella we can still make our way in a downpour to care for the animals and get the chores done.

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  24. My Grandfather was a farmer. I loved going to northern Utah and visit on their farm. He was a hardy fellow for sure!

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  25. Oh I have a love-hate relationship with auctions...love to go but the overwhelming SADNESS at the reason leaves me weak with sorrow. As to the rain...chores have to be done, dry or wet, and I like to eat so love rain as much as sunshine. Although, rain with thunder and lightening and wind isn't my cuppa. Be safe this week, Grace.

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  26. I remember when I first came to Canada and Luke told me that 'it's raining cats and dogs' is an English expression and that here the expression is 'it's raining moose and raccoons'!

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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