Tuesday, July 19, 2016

The country version of Paparazzi

If pleasures are greatest in anticipation,
just remember that this is also true of troubles.
              Elbert Green Hubbard


My heart dropped into my stomach. They had found us. My first thought was that my girls’ lives may never be the same.

This all started the other evening, when I was headed to town. I came across a car parked on the side of the road. This car was parked in front of the gate where my girls and their friends, happened to be hanging out, to try to enjoy their evening. There, in front of that gate, stood two people with fancy cameras. Of course, I pulled over, shut off my Jeep, and then stepped out and walked up to them.

“Hello, these are my girls, may I ask who you are, and why you are taking photos.”  “Oh, we thought they were so beautiful and we could not resist.” I just stood there and smiled because this I understood.
“These girls are already well photographed. May I ask where these photos will be going?”

“I put them on Facebook, Twitter and Snap Chat” she replied.


As we were chatting, they kept snapping photos. I honestly, thought that was a bit rude. The girls were not worried about the camera, and actually posed as per usual. It bothered me a bit, because possibly, I was not the one doing the snapping of photos. I guess, I was feeling protective maybe overly so, and possibly dare I say, jealous. I actually thought of this situation as if those were my children playing in their playground, and someone was snapping photos of them without my permission. Violated may be the word.

I have always been very generous with photos of my girls, and I have always posted photos that I am sure they would agree were flattering. Those who know of my girls and I, will understand that it has always been a big deal to just pick the right hat for those photos. Bossy2 and Red would never want photos circulating around the web that they had not seen nor approved, this I know.


You may think that I am truly being silly but, I, along with Bossy2 and Red, now find ourselves wondering just where these photos have gone. Wondering, who is using them, and for what reason. This is where you my readers, come into play. If you see photos of my girls, anywhere, please let us know because Bossy2 is now worried that they will get into the wrong hands. They have both heard that CUTE COW photos bring a high premium price these days. They have heard the stories of photos being sold for millions of dollars, and honestly they would like to get in on that action. “You can buy a lot of hats with that money” Bossy2 told me.


Seriously …..There was one thing that did bother me. This couple may have not thought anything about it, and I honestly am not too worried about those dare I say stolen photos but, just about five feet away from that gate was something that could have changed their, and our evening.

You see, there was a bull hanging with our girls. He weighs, I am going to guess, two or three thousand pounds or more. That gate that those people hung over, and tried to get “up and personal” with our girls, was just that, a gate. It was not a wall. This would never stop a “riled up” bull from, trying to “get up and personal” with them. Now, that being said, this bull is known to be very gentle; BUT, he is still, a bull.


Readers do you think I was worried for nothing? Would you check out what was in the field you were going to hang over before you hopped out of your car with a camera? I would love to hear what you think.

Later. 

Joining my friend Theresa at Good Fences today. Check it out here.


29 comments:

  1. Now you've got me thinking about photos of dogs and cats I've taken in the past while wandering around town. I do ask permission if a dog is with an owner and usually they don't mind.
    If it was cows in a field, I'd probably be careful not to include anything in the photo that would make them or the area easily identified, but checking for a bull isn't something I'd thought about.
    I do know that if the farmer walked up and asked what I was doing, I'd then ask if he/she minded me taking the photos and if they objected I'd delete them right then.

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  2. As a very, very small child I had to be forcibly restrained from going into a field with two bulls fighting. These days I give them a much wider berth.
    Love your care for the girls...

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  3. people don't understand bulls. i tried to back up my car today to take a pic of a bull with a cattle egret on him, but as i stopped my car, he stood up, ready to take on a challenge. i moved on.

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    1. still chuckling---'i moved on'. So much said in a few words :) :)

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  4. Having been a owner of some equine and bovine boys and girls, I must say I would be put off with people climbing on the gate. I always thought you asked permission first. Some people have no clue of the possible danger to them and even to the animals if they left a gate open or fed them something strange, thinking it was cute.

    So sorry I do not think you strange. I would have probably flogged those people like a mad hen for trespassing.

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  5. There are two ways to look at this. I think you considered both sides. If I was a picture taker I wouldn't think I was out of line. If I was the farm owner, I would have some problems with somebody looking over my property. I know I didn't help you on this one.

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  6. I have often seen many "photographic opportunities" but have not taken the pic. Without, permission, I honestly think this is an invasion of privacy, and borders on trespassing.

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  7. I think it might bug me if people stopped on our road and took pictures of our horses over the pasture fence. I don't know why it would, or if it is appropriate to feel so protective, but I think I would anyway.

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  8. Oh my, food for thought. I love to see cows/bulls or horses in fields and have thought nothing of taking their pictures from a distance. They are all huge animals and I wouldn't want to get close to any of them, especially if the owner wasn't around to calm them or myself down. :-)

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  9. I hear you! And I agree, people just don't think!! A few weeks ago a car stopped along the road (we have lots!!! of tourists around here) and a girl got out to take pictures of the cows. I don't mind that too much, but she then proceeded to climb through the fence and walk across the meadow to take a selfie up close and personal with a cow! I called out to her and started across the meadow, and just that quick she was gone. It might sound nasty, but I wish she would've got shocked by the electric fence! That's trespassing, and it's dangerous!! Thankfully it wasn't the meadow where the bull is! He would've been very unhappy!

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  10. I try to take photos of wild things and inanimate objects. Maybe clowns...
    But, my uncle had a farm with cows and a bull. We were always on notice to STAY AWAY from that bull, gentle as he was. My cousin fell over the gate one time. Thankfully the bull just looked at him (I like to think he was laughing because the kid fell into a goodly amount of mud and manure)...but Uncle Edgar's warnings always stayed with me.

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  11. I'd be thinking of the penchant for suing others for their own ridiculous actions which seems to be 'au courant' these days.

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  12. i try to be respectful and not trespass but sometimes i get so excited! i always ask permission, if i can and try to keep my distance. i would not like my privacy invaded so i totally get it. it's good for me to read about this because i am probably overzealous!!!

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  13. I definitely think you were right to worry. Unfortunately, there are too many people who see all animals as 'cute and fuzzy' without allowing for hugeness and testosterone. I also think that people should ask permission before photographing peoples property, livestock or anything else that doesn't belong to them.

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  14. Agreed. No photos of my place or critters without permission. I have already encountered two folks with camera in hand. This is not a park it is a working farm. Thank you. Good PR job on your part. I can only imagine what would be the remarks if you went to town and were leaning over their front fence snapping away.

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  15. You know I am not country smart and I would probably have done the same thing, although if I saw the bull I would think twice about hanging over a gate. You should be proud that the couple thought your girls beautiful enough to photograph.

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  16. Lots of room for thought on this one. I try to be sensitive when shooting others property knowing I mean no harm but who knows? I should tell the story of my childhood nightmare (dream) involving our neighbor's quite passive milk cow, Bessie--haha.

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  17. Love it! Love the whole blog. You could write a book!!!

    Here in the Netherlands photographing along the public road is allowed, unless there is a specific legal prohibition. You may photographing here on all private terrain when this area is open for the public. But you must stop as soon as the owner or administrator is asking for that. A riding school or horse breeding, could make houserules to visitors. A home rule could be: Forbidden to photograph others animal without permission. But it is not forbidden by law. What are the rules of your country?

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  18. If I had cows and horses, I think I would expect people to stop and take pictures. Especially those that don't get the opportunity to see them very often. I wouldn't mind, UNLESS they were trespassing on private property. That I would not like. Unfortunately people who aren't around farm animals much don't see the same danger that an owner would see.

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  19. I would feel honored to have photos taken of my beautiful farm (if I had one), but yes, the bull would pose a problem.....Here we see signs on fences warning of bulls. x K

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  20. Boy, I often take pics of cows or horses, but I seldom leave the car for it. Many times they come running up to the fence wanting a close up. Wisconsin being the "dairy state" you'd be hard press to shoot any landscape photo and NOT have a cow photobomb your image. ;)

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  21. Good Question. First people should take note of their surroundings and realize they shouldn't be climbing on someone's fence. Taking pictures at a safe distance to me would be okay. I've photographed people's homes and farms and animals myself. I guess unless you totally shut yourself off from the world people are often curious or admiring as these seemed to be with your animals.

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  22. Great presentation. So different and entertaining. At first, I really thought it might be your daughters. Glad it was not.

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  23. I used to get so upset with anyone coming anywhere near my ponies. Sometimes people would even trespass on the land but it was more from a security stand point I think.

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  24. I think we should always take care and note our surroundings.

    In a slightly different context I was in town recently and the number of people (mainly of the younger generation) using their mobile phone to take photo's ... I can't help thinking that if you or I happened to be in the photo we could end up on a Facebook or Instagram page somewhere and not even be aware of it!

    All the best Jan

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  25. You can't fix stupid. We have had 4 people stomped by the wild buffalo in Custer State Park. One was trying to pet the buffalo, when she was trampled. You can worry, but as my sister said, "at some point you have to remove all of the warning labels and let Darwin's Theory of Evolution work itself out."

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  26. A bull definitely does deserve respect. Made me think of all those tourists trying to get a shot of a bear or moose in a national park. There is so much picture-taking happening now and I do hope people are respectful of others' privacy. I hope I haven't been guilty of this. I always try to ask first and don't post any personal shots that are easily recognizable. I like the way you tell the story in such an entertaining way.

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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