Tuesday, November 1, 2016

All packed up......

You cannot change yourself into a character;
You must hammer and forge one for yourself.
                                                James Anthony Froude


Well, we are all packed up and ready to go?

All packed up and ready to stay?

All packed up and ready to change.


It is that time of year again. It is the change of seasons, which means the end of one of our most challenging years here on this farm. I honestly, can say as far as the farm goes I would not want to watch a repeat of this season if it was a series on the television.



All packed up, does not mean the farmers. I am talking about the seasonal equipment that was all packed and put into storage. It was packed up and into the barn, the driveshed and also in another barn. My Hero hooked and unhooked equipment all weekend. There were some things that had to be fixed. There is nothing worse than to pull out your round baler next season and find a belt missing or a bolt broken. You just want to get the job started and get it done when the weather gives you the opportunity. That lesson we learned long ago.


There was the greasing, the oil changing, the little adjustment here and the little adjustment there. Then all was backed into the place where it would ride out the next season and to spend the winter away from the elements (whatever that means).


The elements, now that is always an unpredictable thing. After this year’s unusual spring and then summer we honestly have no idea what to expect as far as snow or cold temperatures go. I do hope we fair better as far as being prepared for whatever will be thrown at us. We were caught off guard a little bit by this last season.

The drought cut our hay supply for this winter in half and that means we will have to cut our herd size in half. This will be a very difficult thing but we farmers, even though we do not like it, we sometimes have to make tough choices. This is one that we had to make and will do. We have no choice. Sometimes life throws you things that test you and you can either, ignore it, and hope all will turn out well, or you grab that proverbial “bull by the horns” and deal with it. We chose the latter.


There are lots of things that went well this summer. I did not ride the tractor all season and it looks like by taking that step I will be ready for next season. My injured back is doing much better and I am hopeful. Honestly, the drought made less hay so it was easier for My Hero to get the hay done by himself with a little help from our friend. See, you can find the good in every situation. There is always one, and you just have to look for it.


I look forward to the snow and to be able to slip on those snowshoes and to explore the bush. To greet the wildlife who probably did not have the easiest of seasons either. Too much heat and not enough rain but plenty of apples. To place hats on cows, and possibly to pick up those knitting needles again.


I have to tell you this was one weird season and I am ready to pack up some things of my own, and move on. The best is yet to come. I do truly believe that. Bring it on I/we are ready.


Later

22 comments:

  1. Never any lack of work on the farm. I'm sorry you have to downsize your herd again. Those hat wearing cows won't know what to do without their daily fashion show.

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  2. The past is the past so let it be gone.
    Good to know most things are done and put away for summer.
    Hugs M xox

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  3. Hi, Buttons - I'm sorry this has been a difficult season. I hope late fall and winter will provide you plenty of time to knit and write and just rest.

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  4. This must have been such a difficult year! I'm looking forward to those snowy days where you're able to pick up your knitting needles and relax!

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  5. Work is never done on a farm.....but thank goodness for farmers!
    I know you'll get through it.......deep breathes......
    **hugs**
    diane @ thoughts&shots

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  6. Love your positive attitude. And hope the coming season is one you will be happy to revisit.

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  7. Are those snails in the first photo? Such lovely shells. The transition from fall to winter goes better for us if we work to put away the summer things and get out the snow shovels and snow rake before we need them. So far, Bob hasn't had to use the John Deere, but he has it ready! I hope your winter gives enough snow for the snowshoes but isn't too hard and too bitter cold.

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  8. We've been winterizing here.

    Those snails? are amazing. Ours are just plain jane snails.

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  9. It has been a tough year for you and I can see you're ready to move on to a better time.
    Sad that you have to cut the herd though.
    What are those blocks the cow is licking on? Salt? Some other necessary mineral?
    I've never seen striped snails before, are they called tiger snails?

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  10. Farmers are eternal optimists.

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  11. Change is good. No matter if it is just the season or a life change. Glad you are ready. We are making preparations here as well, though we have a bit more time than you!

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  12. Well your title on this post scared me at first! I thought you were going to pack up and leave!!! Don't do that! I understand rough weather seasons on a smaller scale, with beekeeping. I've told many people that I might not be a beekeeper next year, especially if I lose my bees this winter. I just don't know that I can do it anymore. Sorry you had to get rid of half of your herd. Hopefully, you can do some contemplating about it all in the bush, and next year will be better.

    Cindy Bee

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  13. The farmer's resilience shines through your story. Hope you have a good winter.

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  14. Once again you have inspired me! Thank you!

    Have a lovely Wednesday and Happy Fall/winter.

    FlowerLady

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  15. Optimism is a wonderful thing!

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  16. I liked that thought . . .
    The best is yet to be . . .
    Go forth!

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  17. We have had a fantastic year for hay and have plenty. I really wish I could send you some!!! Blessings from Missouri!!

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  18. Sorry to hear about your difficult year, and that you have to cut back on your cows :(

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  19. It's gotta feel good to pack up and get everything stowed and let the past season go. Onward and upward my good ole Dad used to say.

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  20. Wise words, as always. Once you choose this way of life, you get equal parts glorious-ness and hardship. Let's hope the glorious-ness is even greater next year.

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  21. I love how positive you are! I imagine that this isn't the first year that something like this has happened though?

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  22. I was reading today about looking for the sugar at the bottom of the cup. Sounds like you are one of those who has made it a habit.

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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