Sunday, August 13, 2017

Among the Thistles

Life, we learn too late, is in the living,
in the tissue of each day and hour.
                                     Stephen Butler Leacock


This morning just as the sun was on her way up, I headed to the bush. This is a place I have not been for quite a while now. I have missed it.

I cheated, I drove the tractor down, part way. I then climbed down and headed into a sea of cows. They seemed to have missed me as much as I had missed them.


The haying season is taking its sweet time around here. The corn, all across our area is as high as I have ever seen it. The thistles are higher than they have ever been. It is more than likely because I truly believe that we are living in some kind of rainforest these days. If there is a small chance of rain, it always seems to fall on this farm. I choose to not think of the haying season and focus on the advantages of this world of ours, which appear to be tipped, a tiny bit.


As I was saying, I headed back to the place that continues to surprise and delight me. Our cows were fully involved in the pasture field that is full of very tall thistles. It is not an ideal thing to have so much thistle growing on our land but we cannot keep up with it this year.


My Hero tells me that when he was back there it was full of bumble bees, goldfinches and butterflies. That would be the real reason that I had headed back. I did not see any such things but I surely was not disappointed in what was found there.


The first thing I saw was a family of partridge, babies and all. My camera and I were not fast enough to capture that precious moment as they ran and flew into the bush. I turned my attention to the calves which are growing and are still very curious as to why I was there.


The sun was peeking over the trees I sat down and let those silly calves creep up a bit at a time to check out my hat and my smile. I am pretty sure they were smiling too. That was also hard to catch as I was mesmerized by the eye to eye contact that became my focus. It is just what I needed.
I am back. My internet is now working, my camera working. I am not working but I am doing what I love the most, in the place that makes me happy.


Those thistles may not belong in the pasture. They are an eyesore for many and are truly unwanted. They cause problems but the beauty that can be found among them is what we must focus on. Life is also like that, I believe. Among the thistles, you will find that good stuff if you look hard enough.

Later


16 comments:

  1. You are so right, as usual! I'm always struck by how beautiful the flowers on those nasty thistles are. Glad you're back! :)

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  2. That is a lovely way of looking at life. Search among the thistles for the beauty. There will always be thistles but, if you look for it, there will always be beauty.

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  3. The thistle flowers are beautiful but the poor cattle would prefer green grass, I'm sure. We have a thistle and burdock problem on our farm, too and this year seems to be worst. It can't be fun for the cows to have to eat around those prickly plants.

    I read up on thistles and it said to cut them down when they are only 8 inches high and keep on cutting them and within one to two seasons, they will be gone. Each thistle plant can produce around 5000 viable seeds. No wonder they are so prolific. I love the photo of the mother with her calf. The calf are growing fast.
    Hugs, Julia

    Hugs,

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  4. Wonderful thoughts indeed and such an amazing landscape. Everything has beauty if you look hard enough. Greetings!

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  5. It is so relaxing to just go out and enjoy the beauty around us, standing out in the field like this among the life amongst the thistles is a blessing indeed.

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  6. Thistles are a nuisance for farmers here, but an important emblem in Scotland. It's all in how you look at things, I suppose.

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  7. Seems we are on the same wavelength, my friend. Not surprising. Looking forward to catching up, as it were. God bless. xo

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  8. I try to dislodge thistles before they flower because, after they do, I have a hard time taking them away from the bees. Your cows and calves are so beautiful!

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  9. Similar to our crops here in southeastern MN. The corn is taller than ever and the weeds in my flower gardens as well....:)

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  10. Yeah I think you know what you are talking about

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  11. We have those purple thistles too. They are interesting to look at, but not a good thing.

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  12. I hear ya about it raining on your farm. Seems to be the way here too. My sister came over about a month ago and as she was getting out of the car she said, "the only place it is raining is at your house!" Those thistles. We have them too. I guess they are good for something though! Glad you were able to get out in the bush. Sometimes we have to make adjustments in how we do things. The important thing is you did it!

    Cindy

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  13. So glad to hear your positive outlook when things are not going so well. Love your photos.

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  14. We did a thistle clean up this past weekend in the back wooded area.
    I tried hard not wiggle the seeds loose . . .
    It is a task each season.
    Along with a huge plant/weed which is tall, with a banmboo strong like stalk, red berries, what is that?
    They are huge . . . and all over . . .
    What a massive haul we took to the local dump site for Free Saturday!

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  15. Sorry to be late catching up. It's great to see you writing your blog again, with so many different "Thoughts,Buttons."
    Cheers, C

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The mind grows by what it feeds on. J.G. Holland

Thank you so much for your comments, they mean more to me then I could ever express. Hug B

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